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Unlikely football star lands in victory lane on NASCAR pit crew

Posted on Aug 13, 2018 in Alumni News

Staying competitive after football

At 6-feet-2, 250 pounds, former KU defensive lineman and part-time fullback TJ Semke knew he was just about the perfect size and body type to play fullback in the NFL. He also knew that NFL offenses no longer feature fullbacks, so career prospects were slim at best.

“That dream kind of died out,” Semke, d’16, says from the North Carolina headquarters of Hendrick Motorsports. “But I still wanted to do something that would keep me competitive and have that locker room feel, be around the guys, and NASCAR ended up being a good fit for that.”

Thrill of victory

Now in his second season with Hendrick Motorsports and his first on the pit crew team for Chase Elliott’s No. 9 Napa Auto Parts Chevrolet, Semke on Aug. 5 got to experience the thrill of victory when Elliott held off the determined Martin Truex Jr. on the Watkins Glen International road course.

TJ Semke | Courtesy Hendrick MotorsportsIt was win No. 1 for Elliott, a third-year driver and son of NASCAR Hall of Famer Bill Elliott, and the 250th in the illustrious racing history of Hendrick Motorsports, and nobody celebrated more enthusiastically in victory lane than a jackman from Kansas City who just a few years earlier knew next to nothing about auto racing.

“It was pretty special for Chase to get his first win, and it was the 250th for the company, which is a big deal,” Semke says. “All the pieces fell together and it ended up being a big deal. It was definitely good vibes coming back to work on Monday.”

An unusual path

Even before he became a professional athlete in NASCAR, Semke’s route through athletics was unusual and his story unique.

Semke fractured a vertebra during his junior season at Lee’s Summit North High School; he made it through his senior season while constantly fighting through “a lot of issues with my discs.” When his doctors finally told him to stop playing football, Semke complied and turned down offers to play at Division II colleges.

He grew up a “big MU guy,” and shocked his family when he came to Lawrence and enrolled at KU as a full-time student.

“Something drew me there,” Semke says. “I liked the school when I went on a visit, so I just went there.”

Ripe for recruitment

An energetic and successful student in high school, Semke likewise threw himself into his studies on the Hill, and even worked part-time for his mother’s boyfriend’s bail bond business, tracking down absconders who skipped court dates.

Although work as a bounty hunter provided the occasional adrenaline rush he still craved, it wasn’t the same as football. After two years away from the sport, Semke was ripe for recruitment when he noticed a University Daily Kansan advertisement announcing open tryouts for football walk-ons.

He tried out during the spring of his sophomore year, made the team, and entered his junior year with sophomore standing in football. A natural fullback in a pro-style offense with little need for fullbacks, Semke fashioned himself a high-energy playmaker on special teams; during practice, though, he moved to the scout team’s defensive line.

Putting in the work

“I was a little bit undersized for that,” he says, “but I was just out there every day, working hard, making plays, and I kind of got noticed. So they thought, why don’t we give this a shot? That whole next spring, my redshirt junior year, they put in a lot of time with me, getting me ready to play, and I ended up starting the first six games of my junior year on the defensive line.”

After being featured in Sports Illustrated thanks to his bounty-hunter background, Semke played defensive end as a senior, along with fullback when necessary—like Turner Gill before him, coach Charlie Weis rarely featured fullbacks—and when his KU playing days were done Semke began focusing on the NFL. He performed well at his Pro Day workouts, earning a workout with the Kansas City Chiefs and a minicamp invitation from the New Orleans Saints.

Leaving football behind

Realistic about his chances, Semke left football behind for good when he was invited to join more than 100 other candidates for pit-crew tryouts at Hendrick headquarters.

Hendrick, it turns out, sends a pit-crew coach out on the road with its race teams, and he spends race weeks visiting collegiate football program near every track, searching for potential recruits. At Kansas Speedway, KU coaches put in a good word for Semke, touting his speed, strength, attitude and energy.

Semke lived up the billing he received from his former football coaches, and in spring 2016 he was introduced as one of five new pit crew recruits at Hendrick’s second Signing Day event.

He spent his first full season learning the jackman’s job on a variety of teams and racing series, and this year was named a full-time member on Elliott’s No. 9 Camaro.

TJ Semke | Courtesy Hendricks Motorsports

Steep learning curve

“TJ is a pretty special guy,” says veteran crew chief Alan Gustafson. “He’s physically gifted, to say the least, to be that big and that fast and strong. He’s a really competitive guy and a fun guy to have on our team. We’ve been really impressed with him and his ability with relatively no experience pitting the car. His learning curve has been amazing. We expect really big things from him in the future.”

Semke’s learning curve got steeper this season when NASCAR announced new pit-lane regulations that allowed for only five crew members over the wall during races, rather than the previous limit of six. That meant double-duty for someone on each crew, and Hendrick’s solution was to make the jackman also responsible for putting on tires, all within the 13-second timeframe of a high-pressure pit stop.

“You have double the work and you’re still trying to be fast,” Semke says. “It presented a lot of challenges, but that’s kind of what’s fun about it. We have a bunch of athletic guys who know how to adapt and change, so it worked out in our favor.”

Brains and brawn

As expected, Semke relishes the vigorous physical environment at Hendrick, where pit crews lift weights under the supervision of a team of trainers, go through full-speed pit training and even spend Mondays doing yoga to improve flexibility.

Perhaps not as expected, though, is the intelligence Semke brings to the team, which pays off in the team’s constant film study. He was named Academic All-Big 12 and graduated with at 3.1 GPA.

“A lot of people might look at me—the tattoos, and I’m a big, strong guy—and they might think, ‘Oh, this guy’s just a meathead, a cave-man type of guy, eats a bunch of meat.’ At a glance you might just think that’s what I am.

“But anything I do I want to be really good at it. I can hit the books and I can hit the weights, both. It definitely feels good to have a degree from the University of Kansas, that’s for sure.”

—Chris Lazzarino


WATCH:

TJ Semke, No. 9 team jackman, gives fans a closer look inside the Hendrick Motorsports heat training program.

 

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University community invited to memorial service for Chancellor Shankel

Posted on Aug 13, 2018 in Campus News

Strong Hall | Del Shankel memorial service
The University of Kansas community is invited to celebrate the life of Chancellor Del Shankel on Saturday, August 18 in Woodruff Auditorium at 4 p.m.

The service will feature remarks by Chancellor Douglas A. Girod, KU Alumni Association President Heath Peterson and former Kansas Athletics Director Sheahon Zenger, as well as faculty colleagues and family members who knew Chancellor Shankel best.

Chancellor Shankel passed away in July at the age of 90. He leaves behind his wife, Carol, their two children and two grandchildren, and countless Jayhawks whose lives he touched.

You can learn more about Chancellor Shankel’s remarkable life by reading Chancellor Girod’s message to the university sent July 12. The Alumni Association also sent an email to members with remarks from Heath Peterson.

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Flying Jayhawks Cruise Alaska with Scot Pollard

Posted on Aug 12, 2018 in News

For the latest Flying Jayhawks trip, we had a special guest join us as host. Enjoy the story of the trip through Glacial Alaska, as only Scot Pollard could tell it.

I had been to Alaska before but it was just to play basketball. When coaches take you on trips they tend to just give you an hour or two of “local stuff” and the rest is practice, rest, and making sure you’re in your bed when you’re supposed to be! Needless to say I hadn’t REALLY experienced Alaska before.
I can definitely say I have now! Wow! All ten days on board and off of our Oceania cruise ship and in the different ports, our group of flying Jayhawks could not avoid the beautiful scenery even if we wanted to.

Stop 1: Ketchikan

Flying Jayhawks Dana and Sue Anderson “kidnapped” my family and took us on a private fishing boat. All 6 of us caught our first salmon and a couple of us caught more than one for a total of 10. We didn’t lose one fish which made our captain, Ray, very surprised. The highlight of this day though didn’t happen in the water. It happened ON IT. Our captain asked if I would whistle at one of the bald eagles overhead. One was flying away but fairly close as I gave it a really loud whistle. Our national bird and a symbol of our country did a 180, headed back towards us as my son Ozzy threw a frozen bait herring in the air. The fish landed about 30 feet from our boat and this amazing bald eagle swooped down and grabbed that fish right in front of all of us!

Stop 2: Juneau

It’s the capital of Alaska don’t “Juneau!”? Ok dad jokes aside, it was really cool to go to a city only reachable by boat or plane. We had originally planned to zip line here, but someone (me!) was too heavy to go. So we scrambled and ended up doing a 12 person canoe trip in a lake which happens to have a glacier running into it.

Highlights: paddling up to about 300 yards away (for safety) from Mendenhall Glacier which was spectacular. Paddling near a waterfall called Nugget falls and getting sprayed just a little with 35 degree water.

Lowlights: Some people don’t paddle much or with everyone else, therefore making it harder to paddle across a 2 mile wide lake.

Did I mention the water was 35 degrees? Yeah it was cold on the lake despite the 65 degree day.

Stop 3: Haines

Bald eagles, bald eagles, and more bald eagles. Due to our encounter with the bald eagle on the fishing trip, we were a little spoiled but still enjoyed our float trip down the Chilkat River in the Eagle Preserve. We were lucky enough to share a raft with flying Jayhawks Virginia Crane and Joan Treece.

Our pilot was Dr. Scott Ramsey, and if you ever go on this adventure, make sure he’s your guide. Not only was he knowledgeable but he was funny and put up with our incessant questions and quest for the perfect river rock to take as a souvenir. There are only about 2,500 residents in Haines, and most of them leave for the winter, so there isn’t a whole lot to do there besides fish. And there’s always fishing. If you get bored of fishing, there’s fishing there. They pride themselves on being “salmon snobs” there. There are certain types of salmon they just won’t eat. Here’s a hint: most of that type of salmon is what we eat in the lower 48 states.

Oh yeah, and we saw about 60 bald eagles!

At sea sailing up to Hubbard Glacier: we had to keep our distance from the glacier as it routinely “calves” ice bergs the size of ten story buildings! We didn’t see any that big, but there were several small ones during our visit. This glacier is about 76 miles long and growing! By 2025 it’s predicted that it will close off the bay we were in entirely.

This day was absolutely eye candy. The sky was perfectly blue the entire time, which we were told is rare in that area. The glacier sparkled in the sun, the icebergs we floated past were amazing. One even broke in half right in front of the ship, revealing its center which looked like gemstones. The ice is 400 years old, and has been compressed so much the air is mostly pushed out, which is why it has that color.

After getting an eyeful and filling our cameras memories with pictures, we sailed away to our next stop. The temperature was in the 70’s which meant that in the protected pool area in the top/middle of the ship it felt like 80’s. Of course a few of us got our swimsuits on and enjoyed the hot tub, sailing away from a glacier, in Alaska.

Not a bad day.

Stop 4: Icy Straight Point in Hoonah

This was my favorite stop. This island features tides that change up to 30 feet four times a day. When our ship docked at 7 a.m., we were able to walk the gangplank to the new dock to get to land. Within an hour, the tide dropped so much that the gangplank was unusable and guests had to board tenders (lifeboats) to get to shore until the tide returned later in the afternoon. We boarded a tram to take a ride through rainforest (yes, rainforest. The Tongass National Park in Alaska is the largest national forest in America. It is also Earths largest temperate rainforest. And my kids thought they were just on this cruise to have fun.) Our team stopped near the “beach” which was a rocky shoreline. We looked for rocks and chatted with the locals from our tram. Then we headed back to where we started for a show.

The natives here are the Tlingit tribe. They were natives of a different area across the bay, but according to their oral history they were pushed off of their native land by a glacier and had to settle here. We learned this and much more in a show we watched with fellow Flying Jayhawks John and Donna Ward and (can’t remember her name!) and Steve (last name). The show was performed by high school aged descendants of the tribe, mostly full blooded members, and narrated by an elder member. Because they hold their history sacred, we were not allowed to video or take pictures of the show, which I thought was very special. They danced, we danced, we listened, and we enjoyed their wonderful history.

This place was also home to the world’s largest “ZipRider” which is a harness version of zip lining. Guess who wasn’t allowed to go again? Yep, the giant guy. Not only was I too heavy but the girl working it said it didn’t matter because I was too tall as well. Giant problems…

On our walk back to the ship we stopped to talk with our fellow Jayhawks who had settled down near the ocean with a pitcher of beer to muse about the show we had just witnessed. My son was skipping rocks into the ocean just ahead when three whales breached about 25 feet off shore right in front of him! We ran down, cameras in hand and got a picture of one of the whales flukes (tails). This shows how close to shore they were.


How were they this close, you ask? Many years ago glaciers carved deep trenches in this area. This made it so that just off shore the ocean floor can be as deep as 800 feet!

From learning about a culture I didn’t know existed to their land and it’s climate to whales popping up to say hello just a few feet away, yeah, definitely my favorite stop!

Stop 5: Sitka

Sitka was founded by Russians. Although my family was annoyed, other people at least tolerated the giant guy who wouldn’t stop talking with the bad Russian accent. We spent most of the day aboard a boat spotting whales, otters, sea lions, dolphins and yes, more bald eagles. Due to our earlier experiences with both the eagles and the whales, we were again a little spoiled on this trip.

Although it was nice, we wish we had spent the day in Sitka learning about the city and its history. We didn’t have enough time to do so after our trip due to needing to be back on the ship so our Sitka experience was limited.

I won best dressed.

The topics included the NCAA, the big 12, television and its impact on amateur athletics, as well as AAU and its effect on basketball specifically (I hate it). There were great points brought up and debates had.

Last stop: Victoria BC

We boarded a bus and got a wonderful tour of some highlights of Victoria on the way to the Burchart Gardens. The area used to be a rock quarry once upon a time and once the limestone was all taken out was abandoned. Well the Burcharts of the early 1900’s wouldn’t have that and created this: “The sunken garden”.

I never thought I would appreciate walking through several different gardens and so many flowers, but it smelled wonderful and the sun was shining (every day of this trip but one!), in fact I was wearing a tank top and shorts! On the way back our bus went through downtown and next to the bay which made us wish we had more time to spend in that beautiful city. Therefore, like Sitka, it will probably be a future stop for the Pollard’s.

It made a great last stop though and provided a great “frame” for our trip. (Sorry, one last dad joke).

If you haven’t considered a trip with the Flying Jayhawks, do so. If you have considered it, pull the trigger. You will not regret it. We had a blast getting to know our fellow alumni and experiencing the wonders and history of Alaska with them. Oceania cruise line is the best cruise line I’ve been on from the food to the service to the accommodations. A trip with perfect weather, venues, nature, and travel companions? Yes, sign me up again!! Rock Chalk Jayhawk!

The Flying Jayhawks trip “Big 12 Glacial Alaska” took place July 13-23, 2018, and was hosted by Scot Pollard! View more photos from the trip; pictures may be downloaded for personal use. Find more information about Flying Jayhawks trips, including a schedule, or sign up for travel emails.

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KU Alumni Association announces partnership with new Best Western Plus West Lawrence hotel

Posted on Aug 9, 2018 in News

Eulich Jayhawk Adams Alumni Center | www.kualumni.org | Best Western Plus partnership
Best Western Plus West Lawrence, one of the newest hotel properties in the Wichita-based Hospitality Development of America portfolio, has partnered with the University of Kansas Alumni Association to sponsor several upcoming alumni events, including the 2018 “Game Day at the Adams” football tailgates at the Adams Alumni Center and the 2018-’19 Presidents Club basketball pre-game activities. The $14.5 million hotel, which is scheduled to open this fall, is adjacent to the Rock Chalk Park complex in west Lawrence and will serve as the exclusive hotel sponsor for these events.

Best Western Plus West Lawrence also will provide support for two of the Alumni Association’s largest annual fundraising events, the Rock Chalk Ball in Kansas City and the Jayhawk Roundup in Wichita, and will offer Association members an exclusive discount on hotel stays.

“The new Best Western Plus West Lawrence hotel will be a fantastic addition to the Lawrence community, and we’re thrilled to team up with them for several upcoming alumni events,” said Heath Peterson, KU Alumni Association president. “Not only will our members benefit from the generous discount offer, but this partnership will also truly enhance our alumni events and help us deliver more programs and services to Jayhawks across the globe.”

Best Western Plus logo“As a proud KU graduate and owner of the new Best Western Plus West Lawrence, I’m excited to partner with the KU Alumni Association and align our brand with the organization that connects Jayhawks back to the Hill and the Lawrence community,” said Steve Martens, CEO of The Martens Companies and its hotel development and management subsidiaries. Martens also is a Life Member of the Alumni Association and a Presidents Club donor.

 

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Dates for KU Kickoff events announced

Posted on Aug 7, 2018 in News

KU Kickoff
KU Kickoff logo for appAs the Kansas football team works through fall camp, Kansas Athletics and the KU Alumni Association have announced four dates providing fans opportunities to meet and greet the Jayhawks before the season begins.

With outings scheduled for Topeka, Wichita, Kansas City and Lawrence, the celebrations will feature food, music, promotional items and the opportunity to win tickets and more. The KU band and spirit squads will be in attendance at the various locations.

KU Kickoff at Topeka

Scheduled for Thursday, Aug. 9 at 6 p.m., outside the Celtic Fox at 8th Street and Kansas Avenue, the KU Kickoff at Topeka will be hosted by the Voice of the Jayhawks, Brian Hanni. Featured speakers will be Chancellor Doug Girod, football head coach David Beaty and women’s soccer head coach Mark Francis.
Facebook event

 

KU Kickoff at Wichita

Slated for Wednesday, Aug. 15 at 6 p.m., at Beech Lake off of 13th Street and Webb, the KU Kickoff at Wichita will again be hosted by Hanni and will feature Girod, Beaty and Director of Athletics Jeff Long.
Facebook event

 

KU Kickoff at Corinth Square (Kansas City)

The 13th annual KU Kickoff at Corinth Square will be held on Friday, Aug. 17 and will get started at 6 p.m., at the parking lot at the Corinth Square Shopping Centre in Prairie Village. Jayhawk radio network football color analyst David Lawrence will host the KU Kickoff at Corinth Square with Girod, Beaty and Long scheduled to attend, along with KU Alumni Association’s Heath Peterson.
Facebook event

 

KU Kickoff at Lawrence

The quartet of celebrations will conclude at David Booth Kansas Memorial Stadium as the KU Kickoff at Lawrence will take place on Saturday, Aug. 25 from 2-4 p.m. The Fun Zone will be set up right on Kivisto Field and gates will open at 2 p.m. Food trucks will be set up around the stadium and the Jayhawk players will sign autographs starting at 3 p.m. Parking for the KU Kickoff at Lawrence and is free and open. Fans attending the event are encouraged to park on the east side of DBK Memorial Stadium in Lots 91 and 94.

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At 100, Dick Schiefelbusch evinces the art of aging gracefully

Posted on Jul 30, 2018 in Campus News

Dick Schiefelbusch's 100th birthday

Distinguished service

Sheer joy and gratitude beamed from University legend Richard Schiefelbusch and the faces of more than 100 celebrants July 28, when KU’s guiding light of teaching and research in human development marked his 100th birthday. His daughter Jeanie Schiefelbusch and the Alumni Association hosted the afternoon event at the Adams Alumni Center.

Dick Schiefelbusch, g’47, became a pioneer in the study of speech, language and hearing after surviving two years in a World War II German prison camp, where he found his calling: a life and career dedicated to helping others. He established KU’s Speech Language Hearing clinic, which bears his name, and for more than 50 years served as a mentor to some of KU’s most accomplished researchers, many of whom attended the party. Schiefelbusch, who grew up on an Osawatomie farm and attended a one-room schoolhouse, earned numerous honors throughout his career, including the Distinguished Service Citation from the Alumni Association and KU. The University’s renowned Institute for Life Span Studies is also named for him.

Seated in front of an array of flags presented by KU’s ROTC units, Schiefelbusch laughed, smiled and made silly faces for countless photos as well-wishers took turns greeting him. A sign on the dessert table hailed him as “The Wise Man of the Prairie” as his three children and representatives from KU’s Veterans Alumni Network (VAN), the Kansas National Guard, the Veterans of Foreign Wars and Haskell Indian Nations University shared tributes. Mike Denning, c’83, director of military graduate studies at KU and president of the VAN, presented Schiefelbusch a framed commemorative challenge coin, and Randy Masten, g’03, assistant director of military graduate studies and secretary of the VAN, read a congratulatory letter from fellow WWII veteran Sen. Bob Dole, ’45, who turned 95 the day before Schiefelbusch turned 100.

Dick Schiefelbusch's 100th birthday

Daughter Carol Schiefelbusch McMillin, ’79, said Dole’s letter was especially touching because the longtime Kansas senator, who suffered grave battle wounds in Italy during WWII, had long championed the research led by Schiefelbusch and other KU scholars. “It just means the world, because his support was so important to Dad’s work and the work of so many others,” she said. In the 1980s, Dole helped secure federal research funding for KU, including a pivotal $9 million grant, and later that decade KU dedicated the Robert J. Dole Human Development Center on Sunnyside Avenue to honor his leadership.

Jeanie, d’80, g’90, said she is grateful “every single day” to her dad, and her brother, Lary, c’65, g’65, described his father’s gratitude to the German citizens who rescued him from the Baltic Sea after his fighter plane was shot down. He echoed his sister’s praise for their dad. “I never knew him to fail me, and I never knew him to falter in his support,” he said. “He gave us something to reach for, but there was never pressure. … He always spoke well of the people he worked with, and he always taught us the importance of collaboration, collaboration, collaboration.” As he repeated one of his father’s favorite words, the crowd joined in the refrain.

When it was his turn to speak, the guest of honor heaped praise on others. “It seems to me that I’ve arrived in the right place in the United States and this world to live my life,” Schiefelbusch declared, “in the company of such helpful people, such rewarding people, such creative people. It is a privilege to be right where I am.”

Sir, the privilege is all ours.

–Jennifer Sanner

Dick Schiefelbusch graced the cover of Issue No. 6, 2009 of Kansas Alumni magazine for a feature story by Julie Mettenburg titled The Particular Genius of Richard Schiefelbusch.

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Jayhawks in the News | July 27

Posted on Jul 27, 2018 in News

KU campus graphics | www.kualumni.org | Jayhawks in the News

Find out what fellow Jayhawks are up to in our weekly edition of “In the News.” It’s like an online version of Class Notes. If you’ve seen Jayhawks in the news who should be featured, email us at share@kualumni.org.

 

Svi Mykhailiuk Prepares for ‘Life, Basketball, L.A.’ | NBA.com

Svi Mykhailiuk, c’18, was raised in a Ukrainian city of 300,000, spent four years among the University of Kansas’ student population and will now look to make his name in the second-largest city in America. But for the past two weeks, he turned heads in Las Vegas, not exactly someplace more inconspicuous.
Read full article.

 

Governor Brown Appoints 12 Superior Court Judges | CA.gov

Governor Edmund G. Brown Jr. today announced the appointment of 12 California superior court judges, which includes Timothy J. Hollenhorst, L’02, of Riverside, who has been named to an interim appointment for a judgeship in the Riverside County Superior Court.
Read full article.

 

Quiet thunder: Hutchinson helped shape ACLU legal director of Kansas | The Hutchinson News

As she traveled, Lauren Bonds, c’09, said she often found “a more hostile work environment” in more conservative states. Still, she felt called home to Kansas. “I think that’s why I really wanted to work at ACLU of Kansas,” she said. “Though I went away and lived in different places and worked in different places, I think this is where the most important work is to be done … I have a lot of affection for my hometown, but I wanted to work where I feel like my work can make a difference. I want to make Kansas better too.”
Read full article.

 

Allstate Taps Kohler Exec As New CMO | Ad Age

There’s a new top marketer at Allstate. The Northbrook, Illinois-based insurer has tapped Elizabeth Brady, j’86, a marketing veteran with experience on both the brand and agency sides, as executive VP-chief marketing, innovation and corporate relations officer.
Read full article.

 

Quinter’s Michael Machen named 2018 Kansas Family Physician of the Year | The University of Kansas Medical Center

Michael Machen, c’77 MD’83, laughs easily when he talks about what all it means to be a doctor in a small rural town in Northwest Kansas. For more than three decades he’s been one of the primary health care providers for the 900 or so people in the farming community of Quinter and many others living in adjoining counties on the High Plains, where trees are sparse and the wind is your constant companion.
Read full article.

 

Lawrence native named new manager of Johnson County | Lawrence Journal-World

The new leader of Johnson County — a Lawrence native with ongoing ties to the city — thinks there will be more opportunities for Johnson County and Lawrence to work together as both communities continue to grow. Earlier this month, the Johnson County Board of County Commissioners appointed Penny Postoak Ferguson, b’92 g’94, as county manager for Johnson County.
Read full article.

Have you heard news about a fellow Jayhawk, or maybe you have news of your own to share? Email us at share@kualumni.org, or fill out our Class Notes form to be included in a future issue of Kansas Alumni magazine. Read more about newsworthy Jayhawks.

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VIDEO: Front and Center

Posted on Jul 20, 2018 in Campus News

Kansas Alumni magazine, issue No. 4, 2018 | Central District

A finger-snap ago, Central District was nothing more robust than an artist’s rendering, a wish list, part of a master plan for what our beloved campus could one day be, how it should live and breathe and teach and embrace, for the next half-century or more.

Less than two years later—“We tried to build it as fast as we could,” said one project architect—and this thing is done.

Or, if not done, close to it, at least for now, and all those fears we might have silently nursed about too much, too soon? Park them. The newly christened Central District—40-plus acres of mostly empty or under-utilized space bordered by Allen Field House, Oliver Hall, 19th Street, Daisy Hill and Irving Hill Road—is suddenly a vibrant center of student life, faculty research and science education.

Read more in the cover feature of issue No. 4, 2018, of Kansas Alumni magazine.

WATCH:

University architect Jim Modig, a,’73, and former University architect, Warren Corman, e’50, guide a tour of KU’s Central District. The Integrated Science Building is the focal point, but it’s joined by new student housing, parking, a new Burge Union, and a utility plant.

 

TIMELAPSE:

Watch a two-minute timelapse video of the Central District under construction.

 

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VIDEO: Kansas Law Enforcement Training Center in Hutchinson

Posted on Jul 20, 2018 in Campus News

Watch the videos below to learn more about the Kansas Law Enforcement Training Center (KLETC). Read additional coverage in issue No. 3, 2018, of Kansas Alumni magazine.

Training approach

The Kansas Law Enforcement Training Center in Hutchinson, a division of KU Professional & Continuing Education, trains the majority of municipal, county and state law enforcement officers—more than 400 in basic training or related programs and nearly 10,000 in continuing education annually. Watch as Gary Warner, a 28-year law enforcement veteran and KLETC instructor, explains the weeklong firearms training course and how the center takes a building-blocks approach to ensure all officers learn proper gun handling and safety skills.

 

Ed Pavey retires

Plus, hear from longtime director Ed Pavey, who retired in June after leading the center for nearly 25 years, and Darin Beck, who succeeds Pavey as KLETC’s new executive director.

 

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Jayhawks in the News | July 20

Posted on Jul 20, 2018 in Alumni News

KU campus graphics | www.kualumni.org | Jayhawks in the News

Find out what fellow Jayhawks are up to in our weekly edition of “In the News.” It’s like an online version of Class Notes. If you’ve seen Jayhawks in the news who should be featured, email us at share@kualumni.org.

 

Catching up with Perry Ellis in Las Vegas | The Wichita Eagle

Wichita native and former KU standout Perry Ellis, ’16, reflects on his basketball career in Las Vegas, where he’s playing with the Milwaukee Bucks in the 2018 NBA Summer League.
Read full article.

 

Interim provost partners with KU alumni to create drug addiction treatment, research center | University Daily Kansan

Two University alumni have partnered with Interim Provost Carl Lejuez to open a treatment center at the University to fight the national opioid epidemic. A $2 million contribution from Glady Cofrin and Daniel Logan made the center possible.
Read full article.

 

Steinbock Joins Razorbacks | Arkansas Razorbacks

Courtney Steinbock, c’05, has been named the sixth head coach in Arkansas women’s tennis history. “In her successful coaching career, Courtney has displayed the same on court passion and competitive spirit that made her an outstanding student-athlete at the University of Kansas,” Hunter Yurachek, University of Arkansas Vice Chancellor and Director of Athletics, said.
Read full article.

 

Woodfin appoints director of cultural preservation to oversee Gaston Motel renovations | Alabama

Birmingham Mayor Randall Woodfin created the position of director of cultural preservation. Denise E. Gilmore, b’77, was appointed to the role and started in July, according to the mayor’s office. “It’s important that we have someone in place to oversee the preservation and promotion of our local treasures, which is why I deemed it necessary to have someone like Denise Gilmore take the lead on this initiative,” Woodfin said in a statement.
Read full article.

 

46 Days Until Kansas Football: The Lost Jayhawks – An Interview with Kevin Kopp | Rock Chalk Talk

Get to know Kevin Kopp, a defensive lineman at KU from 1993-1996. Kopp played on the 1995 team that went 10-2 and won the Aloha Bowl.
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Name Dropping – Symphony Ball | The Independent

Mary, f’65, and John M. Edgar, b’65, will serve as the honorary chairmen of the 2018 Symphony Ball, “To Paris With Love,” presented by the Symphony League of Kansas City. It will be held September 8 at The Westin Kansas City at Crown Center.
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Allstate & AFCA Announce 2018 Good Works Team® Nominees | AFCA Insider

Allstate Insurance Company and the American Football Coaches Association (AFCA) announced 169 nominees for the2018 Allstate AFCA Good Works Team®.  The list of nominees includes Kansas football player Joe Dineen, b’18.
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Derek Bridges Hired as President of BML and President of Channel Management for ValueHealth  | Markets Insider

ValueHealth CEO Carl King announced the hiring of Derek Bridges, b’99, as President of Benefit Management. Mr. Bridges will replace outgoing Benefit Management President Denise Wilkens and will be responsible for providing strategic leadership for the company and for ensuring that company financial objectives are met.
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Dr. Karen Cox Named President of Chamberlain University | Career Education Review

Adtalem Global Education announced Dr. Karen Cox, PhD, RN, FACHE, FAAN, n’83, as the new President of Chamberlain University, and she will begin her leadership on August 27, 2018. Dr. Cox is a highly accomplished nursing and healthcare leader, who most recently served as Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer of Children’s Mercy – Kansas City, an independent, academic medical center in Missouri.
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Former KU guard Ben McLemore headed back to Sacramento in two-team trade | KUSports.com

The Memphis Grizzlies are down a Jayhawk and Ben McLemore is headed back to the place where he began his NBA career.
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Former chancellor Shankel remembered for his devotion to KU, students | Lawrence-Journal World

Just call him “Mr. Jayhawk.” That’s how Heath Peterson describes former two-time University of Kansas Chancellor Delbert “Del” Shankel, who died Thursday, July 12, at age 90. It was Shankel who convinced KU Alumni Association leadership to promote Peterson, then a part-time student worker at the Adams Alumni Center, to his first permanent position with the association in 2004, Peterson said.
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Charlie Hustle to sell T-shirts inspired by classic designs for KU fans | University Daily Kansan

Charlie Hustle, a T-shirt company inspired by classic designs from sports and popular culture, opened a shop inside McLain’s Market. Based in Kansas City, Charlie Hustle is owned by Chase and Holly McAnulty, f’10.
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