’Hawks in Rock

Posted on Feb 28, 2014 in News

img_arizona_rock_jayhawk

Have you ever heard of the term “Pareidolia?” Most people haven’t, but surely everyone has experienced it. Pareidolia (parr-i-DOH-lee-uh) is the phenomenon of recognizing familiar shapes in clouds or objects, the man in the moon, religious icons in toast … or Jayhawks in rocks.

Tim Brandt, b’74, director of the Adams Alumni Center, saw this rocky likeness of our beloved mascot while he was running around the Troon North Golf Course in Scottsdale, Ariz. He was struck by the shape of an outcropping of rock, and he sent us the photo. “All you need is a little paint, and it would look just like the Jayhawk,” he says.

img_rockJayThrough the years, alumni have sent images of Jayhawks in clouds, piles of leaves and even puddles. The Adams Alumni Center is also home to a collection of figurines from alumni, including this cute little Jayhawk made from four garden rocks glued together and painted in bright hues. No one knows who sent it or when, but its silhouette does look quite a bit like the rock formation in Arizona.

Studies show that if a person sees images in objects and clouds, an activation in the brain has occurred. Alumni know that when we see Jayhawks everywhere, there’s been an activation in the heart. If you have images of your own “Hawk Pareidolia,” email them to us at share@kualumni.org so we can post them.

—Susan Younger

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