Jayhawks in the News | March 24

Posted on Mar 24, 2017 in Alumni News and News

KU campus graphics | www.kualumni.org

University alumna’s run-in with the law brought her to run her own animal law practice | University Daily Kansan

Katie Barnett runs an animal law practice out of her home outside of Lawrence. The lifelong animal lover was inspired to attend law school after an incident with the police and a pit bull ban in Shawnee. She graduated from the KU School of Law in 2011.
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New Pizzeria Coming to Downtown Lawrence | 6 News Lawrence

New York native and KU alumnus Joe Kieltyka, d’69, is bringing New York style pizza to Lawrence. His restaurant, Stonewall Restaurant and Pizzeria, will feature pizza, fried chicken, and other sandwiches and salads.
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Voice of the Kansas Jayhawks Brian Hanni credits Topeka West teacher with inspiring him | Topeka Capital-Journal

Without the help of Topeka West High School teacher Corey Wilson, Brian Hanni might not be “The Voice of the Kansas Jayhawks.” Back in the mid-1990s when Hanni was a student at Topeka West, he wanted to explore sports broadcasting, but the school’s TV program didn’t offer the option. Wilson “moved mountains” to help Hanni learn how to call plays.
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Prairie Band LLC Names Jacob Wamego New President & CEO | Native News Online

The Prairie Band, LLC Board of Directors are proud to announce Jacob “Tug” Wamego will serve as the company’s President and CEO, a position he has held in the interim since May. Wamego, l’14, is a licensed attorney in the state of Kansas and Prairie Band Potawatomi Nation.
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Student Veterans Host ‘A Run to Remember’ | VFW.org

A tradition is building at the University of Kansas. A group of student veterans — many of whom are VFW members — are using their smarts, logistical know-how and passion for running to help their fellow vets. The run in November 2016 was the “biggest one so far,” according to the event’s co-director Randy Masten, g’03, assistant director of KU’s Office of Graduate Military Programs.
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Max Falkenstien is still a mainstay at Allen Fieldhouse, 11 years after capping his 60-year career | University Daily Kansan

Max Falkenstien started his radio broadcasting career in 1946. The first game he ever called was Kansas versus Oklahoma A&M (now Oklahoma State) in the NCAA tournament that year. His career spanned 60 years, and he retired in 2006.
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Christina Hoxie, AICP, Associate Principal, to direct BNIM’s nationally recognized planning studio | BNIM

With a diverse background of academic and professional work in interiors, architecture, and planning, Christina Hoxie, g’08, g’09, looks for opportunities to develop richly interdisciplinary teams and collaborate with the people of each community to design places, strategize programs and create policies that will help to fulfill their shared vision.
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Chicagoan Obsessed With World War II History Creates Wildly Popular Sites | DNA Info

Kip Reiserer has no ties to World War II, but the 28-year-old Lakeview resident is obsessed with the topic. Reiserer, j’10, is the creator of wildly popular Facebook, Instagram and Twitter pages devoted to World War II history, facts and photos.
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Two Executives to Leave Uber, Adding to Departures | New York Times

Brian McClendon, e’86, is leaving Uber after two years to return to his home state of Kansas. McClendon previously worked for Google for more than a decade and was instrumental in creating Google Earth. He indicated that he wants to explore politics.
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KU grad, Uber exec moving back to Lawrence to ‘explore politics’; mentions 2nd Congressional District | LJWorld.com

One of the University of Kansas’ more well-known — and most tech savvy — alumni is moving back to Lawrence from the Silicon Valley area, and it appears he may be eyeing a political run. Here’s another article about Brian McClendon’s pending return to Kansas.
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Landon and Lucas, meet Landen Lucas | KUSports.com

Ten months after learning about the sly and sweet story of a set of twins being named in his honor, Kansas senior Landen Lucas got the chance to meet them Saturday in the lobby of the team hotel before the Jayhawks’ practice. The twins’ parents are Ian, d’11, and Meredith Sadler, who live in Tulsa.
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Shook, Hardy & Bacon Elects 10 New Partners | shb.com

Three KU School of Law graduates—Sarah Baltzell, l’08; Devin K. Ross, l’09; and Lindsey K. Heinz, l’09—have been elected to partnerships effective March 1.
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Business Briefcase | Hays Daily News

The law firm of Hampton & Royce announced its elevation of Lee Legleiter from associate attorney to a member of the firm. Legleiter received his juris doctorate from the KU School of Law in 2011 and has practiced with the firm since 2011.
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AMS announces promotions | City Biz List

Beau Jackson has been promoted to partner at Adduci, Mastriani & Schaumberg, LLP, effective January 1. He graduated from the KU School of Law in 2009.
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Fortissimo Fan Fare

Posted on Mar 15, 2017 in Alumni News and News

Carrying on traditions that date back to the days when the Jayhawks played in Hoch Auditorium, the men’s basketball band fills Allen Field House with an energizing mix of musicianship, enthusiasm, school spirit and just plain fun. Hear director Sharon Toulouse, f’97, g’05, and many of her talented musicians explain the stories behind their rites and rituals, and read more about it in “Fortissimo Fan Fare,” in issue No. 2, 2017, of Kansas Alumni magazine.

 

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Military-affiliated student center finds new home in Summerfield Hall

Posted on Mar 14, 2017 in Alumni News and News

Lt. Gen. William K. Jones Military-Affiliated Student Center | www.kualumni.org

More than 100 faculty, staff, students and guests attended a ribbon-cutting ceremony March 9 at the newly named Lt. Gen. William K. Jones Military-Affiliated Student Center at the University of Kansas.

The nearly 3,000-square-foot center, located in Summerfield Hall, honors Jones, c’37, a highly decorated U.S. Marine Corps veteran whose 33-year military career included tours in World War II, the Korean War and the Vietnam War.

“We’re honored to name the center after a distinguished KU alumnus and Marine Corps veteran who served for more than three decades,” said Director April Blackmon Strange. “This center provides us with an inviting space to better serve our growing number of military-affiliated students—from the first time they express interest in KU to Commencement and beyond.”

More than 1,100 military-affiliated students on campus have access to the center, which includes a lounge with computers and televisions; quiet spaces for tutoring and studying; meeting and conference rooms; free printing and copying services; and assistance from an onsite Kansas Commission on Veterans Affairs representative.

For the past two years, the University has been named a top-10 school for veterans by the Military Times and has also been recognized by other organizations that rate schools on their military student services.

Lt. Gen. William K. Jones family | www.kualumni.orgSeveral of Jones’ family members attended the ceremony, including his son, William K. Jones Jr., who also served in the Marine Corps; his daughter; his nephew, Jim Jones Jr., a retired Marine Corps general and the former U.S. National Security Adviser for President Barack Obama; and several grandchildren and great-grandchildren.

“We’re all really excited about this honor to my father,” said Bill Jones Jr., c’81. “He loved KU, and he loved being a Kansas Jayhawk.”

Chancellor Bernadette Gray-Little praised Jayhawks for their persistence in making the center a reality for military-affiliated students and noted its critical role in the University’s mission to build strong, healthy communities.

“This center represents another commitment to our veterans and military-affiliated students,” she said. “I am proud that our University recognizes and addresses the unique needs of this population of students.”

JR Cadwallader, a Marine Corps veteran and president of KU’s Student Veterans of America, noted that the organization’s new home on campus was “well worth the wait.”

“The Lt. Gen. William K Jones Military-Affiliated Center is here to leverage the unique strengths and talents we bring to the University of Kansas,” he said. “We now have a center to help us create better students, a better campus, better communities and a better nation for the next generation of successful veterans.”

—Heather Biele

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Jayhawks in the News | March 10

Posted on Mar 10, 2017 in Alumni News and News

KU campus graphics | www.kualumni.org

Putting Kansas ‘on the map': University alumna brings major film and TV projects to the Midwest | University Daily Kansan

Audiences all over the world saw the Kansas City skyline last year in “American Honey.” The film, which received six nominations at the Independent Spirit Awards — including Best Feature and Female Lead — stars actor Shia LaBeouf. Kansas City Film Commissioner Stephane Scupham, a 1999 graduate and University alumna, worked with the crew of “American Honey” for the duration of its stay in Kansas City.
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The Most Important Coach You’ve Never Heard Of | FountainCityFrequency.com

A documentary came out last year celebrating the life of that coach. “Fast Break: The Legend of John McLendon” was directed by University of Kansas film Professor Kevin Willmott who says McLendon is an American hero. In 1936, McLendon was the first black man to graduate from KU with a Physical Education degree.
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Law professor, practicing lawyer pens memoir on attaining third degree at age 72 | University of Kansas

Plenty of people go back to school at a nontraditional age. But most of them don’t take classes for a doctorate at a school in which they are also a professor. Or while they are practicing law full-time. Or at the age of 72. But that’s exactly what Bruce Hopkins did when he decided to get an SJD at the University of Kansas School of Law, where he also serves as a professor from practice.
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Alumni Spotlight: Rebecca Linwood | KU Center for Undergraduate Research

The Center for Undergraduate Research highlights alumni accomplishments on their website. Rebecca Linwood, c’05, is featured this month. Linwood earned a degree in cell biology and is a senior scientist at Merck Animal Health.
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Greenberg Traurig Adds Powerhouse Attorneys to White Collar Practice | PRNewswire.com

Nathan Muyskens, former Co-Chair of the White Collar Criminal Defense and Investigations Practice at Loeb & Loeb, joined the Washington, D.C. office of Greenberg Traurig. Muyskens earned a degree from the KU School of Law in 1995.
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Catina Taylor wants to restore Kansas City’s hopes and dreams in education with new tiny school | The Lean Lab on Medium.com

Kayla Smalley sat down with Catina Taylor, co-founder of the V Form Alliance and founder of Dreams KC, to hear about her entrepreneurial journey in building a new tiny school in Kansas City. Taylor is a 1999 graduate of the KU School of Law.
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Pelicans Sign D-League’s Wayne Selden Jr. | BlacktopTV

The New Orleans Pelicans have signed current D-League player and former Kansas star Wayne Selden Jr. The 6-5, 230-pound guard has averaged of 18.5 points, 4.8 rebounds, and 2.9 assists this season with the Iowa Energy.
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Former Kansas men’s basketball great Bill Hougland passes | KUAthletics.com

William “Bill” Hougland, former Kansas men’s basketball player and the first player in Olympic basketball history to win two gold medals, died March 6 in Lawrence. He was 86. Hougland, b’52, was a former member of the KU Alumni Association’s national board of directors.
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New KU building illustrates ‘transparency’ | 6 News Lawrence

KU’s new School of Business building opened its doors last May—and it’s already received several awards and national recognition. David Broz, a’97, an architect for Gensler says while conceptualizing the building back in 2009, the country was in a recession—and staff wanted to bring nobility back to business.
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Kansas City-based watchmaker Niall proud sponsor of Rock Chalk Ball

Posted on Mar 9, 2017 in Alumni News and News

Rock Chalk Ball

Kansas City-based luxury watchmaker Niall is a top-tier sponsor of the 2017 Rock Chalk Ball, the University of Kansas Alumni Association’s largest annual fundraising event, April 29 at the Overland Park Convention Center. Hosted by the Greater Kansas City Alumni Network, the event raises funds for Association programs to advocate for KU, communicate to alumni and friends in all media, recruit students and volunteers, serve alumni and KU, and unite all Jayhawks.

As a presenting sponsor of the event, Niall will donate two of its limited-edition Fieldhouse Blue watches to the Association, one of which will be auctioned at the Rock Chalk Ball. The exclusive watch is officially licensed by KU and features basketball founder James Naismith’s original 13 rules of basketball micro-inscribed on the dial of the timepiece. Only 126 pieces of this watch have been produced—emblematic of the number of years since the inception of the game in 1891. A portion of the watch’s ongoing sales will be donated to Kansas Athletics and the Williams Education Fund.

Niall’s partnership with the Alumni Association also includes other opportunities for alumni engagement.

“We are immensely grateful to Niall for its generous sponsorship of the Alumni Association’s Rock Chalk Ball and other events,” said Heath Peterson, Association president. “Kansas City is the nation’s largest community of Jayhawks, and our programs, especially in recruiting legacy students, are vital to strengthening KU.”

“Niall is thrilled to sponsor this year’s Rock Chalk Ball,” said Association Life Member and Presidents Club Member Michael Wilson, b’05, founder and CEO of Niall. “This is a great way for us to support the Alumni Association and its mission to connect Jayhawks to the University of Kansas.”

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Alumni Profile: Ryan Colaianni

Posted on Mar 8, 2017 in Alumni News and News

Ryan Colaianni, j’07, c’07, is vice president of Edelman in Washington, D.C. He lives in Arlington, Virginia, where he leads the Washington, D.C. Alumni Network and has hosted numerous student recruitment and alumni events. In 2011, he received the Dick Wintermote Award, which honors network volunteers who have demonstrated extraordinary leadership to their network and the alumni association. Ryan is also a member of the KU Alumni Association’s national board of directors.

I became a Jayhawk because…

Ryan Colaianni, j'07, c'07I knew that I wanted to study journalism at a university that allowed me to write for the student paper my freshman year. I started working for the Kansan before my first class and by my sophomore year, I was traveling the country covering the KU football team. By my junior year I was covering the men’s basketball team. I was writing professionally for the Lawrence Journal-World and the Topeka Capital Journal before I graduated.

How has KU propelled you into your current career?

The hands-on experience I gained at KU through a variety of activities, including the University Daily Kansan, and spending a summer as an orientation assistant helped develop my writing skills and instilled an ability to meet any deadline.

Where is the most unexpected place you’ve ever heard someone yell, “Rock Chalk”?

I’ve heard it everywhere! From Copenhagen to Florence to Jamaica, there is not a place I have been while wearing a KU shirt that I haven’t heard “Rock Chalk.” That bird helps make real connections in the places you least expect it.

What made your degree program distinctly KU?

I visited a number of journalism schools while looking at colleges and most provided a bland presentation with dozens of other prospective students. When I visited KU, I toured with just one other potential student and got to meet real students and professors to hear firsthand how I could succeed at KU. That experience carried over throughout my four years.

How did KU push you to try harder or to try something new?

I didn’t know a soul when I arrived at KU from the east coast. The campus community was unbelievably accepting, and I quickly had a number of different niches and groups to be a part of. From Greek life, to my classes, to the campus activities I picked, I was always challenged to go further and try something new.

My best advice for college students is…

Go to class. It will save you hours of pain when you try to cram for that exam or write that paper.

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‘Spy Sites’ offers espionage tour of nation’s capital

Posted on Feb 27, 2017 in Alumni News and News

In the wake of a ceaseless stream of headlines and social-media chatter about international espionage, Georgetown University Press’ recent publication of Spy Sites of Washington, DC, the latest installment in a series of espionage history books written by retired CIA officer Robert Wallace, g’68, and historian H. Keith Melton, could not have come at a more opportune time.

Thanks to public fascination with the topic, the Washington Post recently promoted the book to its politically minded readership with an attractive, graphics-laden package featuring many of the sites Wallace and Melton featured in their book.

“I was surprised. I had no idea it would catch the attention of somebody there,” Wallace says from his Virginia home. “I think it was one of the cases where you just kind of catch a news cycle.”

Bob WallaceWallace, a former CIA station chief who ended his long career at the agency as director of its Office of Technical Service, began his writing career, and partnership with Melton, with the authoritative and fascinating Spycraft [Kansas Alumni magazine, issue 2, 2008], which brought to light countless previously untold chapters in the thrilling history of the CIA’s spytechs, with their ingenious devices and courageous exploits.

Wallace and Melton continued with, among others, The Official C.I.A. Manual of Trickery and Deception and Spy Sites of New York City. As with the New York book, Spy Sites of Washington, DC is designed with a dual purpose in mind. It can be enjoyed at the reader’s leisure at home or, with its extensive maps and photographs, dropped into a backpack to serve as a guidebook to explore sites where notable espionage once took place.

A favored tour for Wallace is a stretch he’s dubbed the “Spy Mile,” featuring 25 spy sites that stretch from the Mayflower Hotel, down 16th Street to the White House, then east to the International Spy Museum on F Street.

“Having the information in front of you and then being at the site is the difference between watching the Jayhawks play in Allen Field House and watching them on a television in some bar,” he says. “You get the same information both ways, but you experience it totally differently.”

Wallace says he was surprised to learn during his research for this book—which he describes as “much more substantial” than Spy Sites of New York City—about ceaseless foreign involvement in American affairs across the entire span of our country’s history.

“Not only in terms of foreign countries attempting to, quote, steal American secrets, the information side, but also the influence side,” he says. “Foreign governments, through their intelligence organs, have consistently, regularly, always attempted to influence American politicians, influence American policy, influence the American public, and, by extension, either directly or indirectly, the American vote.

“I was surprised by that. I didn’t have a previous awareness of how consistently that played out over the years.”

Given that those are exactly the charges currently being bandied about in the early days of the current presidential administration, Wallace suggests using caution to draw exact parallels: “The dynamics of any particular age are of that age,” he says.

Instead, Wallace says, Americans should use that history to learn more about how such foreign efforts were dealt with in earlier times.

“What history teaches you is that maybe you shouldn’t be so surprised and shocked when things happen, because there’s probably historical precedence. But, maybe you can draw some lessons learned in terms of how similar situations were effectively, or not so effectively, dealt with.”

—Chris Lazzarino

Additional coverage:

100 Percent Chance There Is a Spy Site in Your DC-Area Neighborhood | NBC Washington

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Jayhawks in the News | February 24

Posted on Feb 24, 2017 in Alumni News and News

KU campus graphics | www.kualumni.org

KU provost introduces new program to help break down barriers for first-time students | Leader & Times

KU Provost Neeli Bendapudi visited southwest Kansas recently to discuss efforts made at the University of Kansas to alleviate transfer issues as well as a program to help Pell Grant and first-generation college students acclimate to a large campus. Alumnus Al Shank, a member of the KU Alumni Association’s national board of directors, is also mentioned in the article.
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Dole Institute unveils full slate of spring programs | The University of Kansas

The Dole Institute of Politics at the University of Kansas has announced additional public programs for the spring 2017 semester. A group of distinguished KU alumni will headline the semester’s programming, including 2017 Dole Lecture guest Robert Kaplan.
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Filling the Federal Reserve Board Vacancies? | The Beacon, Independent Institute

Sheila Bair has been mentioned as a potential candidate for one of three vacancies on the Federal Reserve Board. Bair, c’75, l’78, is currently the president of Washington College in Chestertown, Maryland.
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Sook joins Jeter Law Firm as a partner | Hays Post

Christopher W. Sook has joined Jeter Law Firm LLP in Hays as a partner. Sook, l’02, has a general civil practice.
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University alumnus and Guinness World Record holder determined to win Taco Bell wedding | University Daily Kansan

Dan Ryckert, an alumnus who holds two Guiness World Records and is a well-established voice in the gaming community, and his fiancee are competing to become the first couple to be married in the new Taco Bell Chapel in Las Vegas. Ryckert, c’08, has also published six books, including one about his experiences at KU.
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Spencer Fane Reunites With Lovett-Bowman, Expands Litigation Practice | Market Wired

Stephanie A. Lovett-Bowman, c’05, j’05, l’10, has rejoined the Spencer Fane’s litigation practice after serving with the U.S. Department of Education. Previous to her time at the DoE, Stephanie served with Spencer Fane for five years.
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Virtual reality field trips offer black history experiences for KC students | Startland

Catina Taylor, a co-founder of the V Form Alliance, uses virtual reality that allows elementary and middle school students to take a “field trip” exploring landmarks in Kansas and Missouri that are relevant to black history. Taylor earned a degree from the KU School of Law in 1999.
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School board veteran Mary Loveland among candidates for vacant seat | LJWorld.com

Mary Loveland, a member of the KU Alumni Association’s national board of directors from 1977-1982, is a candidate for the open seat on the Lawrence school board. Loveland, c’70, previously served on the board from 1987-2003 and again from 2007-2011.
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National champion, KU basketball alum Brandon Rush set for jersey retirement | Topeka Capital-Journal

Former KU basketball star Brandon Rush, ’09, was honored at the Feb. 22 basketball game when his jersey was retired at halftime.
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Family negotiates fun into Sunflower State rivalry

Posted on Feb 3, 2017 in Alumni News and News

Justin and Kelly Law | www.kualumni.org

Justin Law is the first to admit that his spouse is much better at compromising than he is—especially when it comes to watching college sports. But he’s no stranger to compromise either.

Justin, b’99, g’04, a diehard Jayhawk, lives in Manhattan with his wife, Kelly, a K-State graduate. They met in Kansas City in 2004, thanks to a friend who played matchmaker. An engagement soon followed, and the young couple decided to ditch the big city and move to a smaller town.

“Manhattan wasn’t necessarily on the list at the time,” Justin recalls wryly.

That changed when Kelly accepted a job at the K-State Alumni Association. The Laws have been in the Little Apple ever since.

The Laws | www.kualumni.orgDespite the fact that Justin bleeds crimson and blue, and Kelly’s pride is purple, the two make it work. “She’s come to KU basketball games with me but not against K-State,” says Justin. “I’ve been to K-State football games when they’re not playing KU. I’m a little more competitive and more interested in the outcome of sporting events, especially against K-State—especially living in Manhattan.”

Kelly, who now works at USI Insurance Services and counts the KU Alumni Association as one of her clients, has softened her stance against her intrastate rival. “I will willingly go to KU games when they’re not playing K-State, and I’ll cheer for KU,” she says. “But I typically wear pretty neutral colors.”

Justin gets a little support from their daughter, Kherington, who’s almost 7. The young girl, who at first favored the Wildcats over the Jayhawks, has been singing a different tune lately. The future Jayhawk, who is a big fan of Baby Jay and can easily recite KU’s alma mater, proudly sports her Jayhawk cheerleading outfit to school and willingly endures teasing from her teachers and classmates.

“She actually started out a K-State fan,” says Justin. “Around the age of 4, she switched allegiances. I’m honestly not sure how that happened. I wish I knew how, so if she started wavering I could bring her back.”

The Laws keep the family rivalry fun by placing wagers, which include dinner duty or a household chore for the losing fan, on KU vs. K-State games. “We have a lot of family bets,” says Kelly. “It’s always Kherington and Justin against me.”

Although Justin and his daughter often don’t fare well during football season, they look forward to basketball season and rely on their ’Hawks to outplay the Wildcats—if for no other reason than to dodge dinner duty. Here’s hoping they get their win.

—Heather Biele

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Yell leader remembers early spirit squad years

Posted on Jan 30, 2017 in Alumni News and News

KU Spirit Squad alumni 1960
Pete Anderson, f’60, recently reminisced about his time on the KU Spirit Squad. The post below was originally published on the KU Spirit Squad Alumni Facebook page, and is reprinted here with permission. Check out their page each Monday for a new alumni feature.

We had no budget. Dick Wintermote of KU Alumni was our sponsor, and we were supplied with the heavy red sweaters and a “letter jacket,” and the jacket had to be returned at the end of the season. We paid our own expenses for the most part; some of the squad had cars so we got to go to Manhattan, Ames, Columbia and maybe a few other places. We practiced in the Union building once or twice a week. This was just the beginning of the acrobatic era and we did very little at that time. I think Dick Wintermote saw the future with more gymnastics coming along…and wow…now it’s awesome.

Late August 1958, Dick Jones, our head cheerleader, brought over ten megaphones. I painted them all white, and then put on the red KANSAS and the persons name on the back. It was quite a job but I was excited to be a part of the squad and to do the megaphones. We supplied our own white pants and black and white saddle shoes, and the girls had white pleated skirts and a “jerken” in blue as they called them; sort of a slip-over-the-head sleeveless sweater garment. We all thought we were hot stuff at that first football game. We soon learned how HOT the heavy wool sweaters could be.

KU Spirit Squad alumni 1960

One highlight was meeting Louie Armstrong who was playing at the Union. The team came in after a game and he struck up “When The Saints Come Marching In.” Imagine standing right next to Louis Armstrong with your team right there…incredible.

Ken Gray and I were both Phi Psis on the team and our house was proud of our participation. Carol Abernathy was my partner and she was great. Jane Perry was from Lawrence so I had known her all through school. Ann Underwood married KU basketball player Lynn Kindred who later became an MD…as did Howie Elfeldt and Ken Gray. Heather Grayham was a tiny girl and we called her “Heather The Feather.”

Sadly I have lost track of all the gang, but have seen Jane Perry off and on through the years. Three years ago we moved to a town home at Lawrence Presbyterian Manor, and while sorting out 36 years of stuff from our house, I found my red sweater in a bag with moth balls…all those years, and in perfect condition…so I donated the sweater to the Booth Hall at Allen Field House. Dick Jones’ daughter brought in his sweater and megaphone also. Representing KU was, and is, always a pleasure.

I look forward to the Kansas Alumni magazine throughout the year and often recall familiar names from yesteryear.

Pete Anderson
Class of 1960

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