KU to present three honorary degrees at 2019 Commencement

Posted on Nov 8, 2018 in Alumni News and News

Strong Hall | KU honorary degrees 2019

An Olympic gold medalist and humanitarian, a former director of the Smithsonian American Art Museum and the CEO of a global scientific instrumentation company will receive honorary degrees from the University of Kansas.

Billy Mills, Elizabeth Broun and Teruhisa Ueda will each receive an honorary degree at KU’s 147th Commencement on May 19, 2019, in David Booth Kansas Memorial Stadium. The three nominations were approved earlier today by the Kansas Board of Regents.

“Billy Mills, Elizabeth Broun and Teruhisa Ueda have made lasting contributions to our world,” said Chancellor Douglas A. Girod. “They embody the mission of the University of Kansas and serve as role models for students, faculty, staff and individuals throughout society who want to make meaningful contributions to the world around them. I am thrilled for the chance to recognize these three exceptional individuals at Commencement, and I know their presence will make the day that much more special for our graduates and their families.”

The degrees to be awarded and the justification for each are as follows:

  • Billy Mills will receive the degree of Doctor of Humane Letters for his outstanding contributions to improving the lives of Native Americans and commitment to lifting the voices of diverse and underrepresented people.
  • Elizabeth Broun will receive the degree of Doctor of Arts in honor of her extraordinary contributions to the field of American visual history.
  • Teruhisa Ueda will receive the degree of Doctor of Science for his outstanding contributions to science and technology.

KU awards honorary degrees based on nominees’ outstanding scholarship, research, creative activity, service to humanity or other achievements consistent with the academic endeavors of the university. Recipients do not need to be KU alumni, and philanthropic contributions to the university are not considered during the process. The university first began awarding honorary degrees in 2012 and has since presented 16 such degrees, not including the 2019 nominees announced today. For additional information and a list of past degree recipients, visit honorarydegrees.ku.edu.

2019 Honorary Degree Recipient Profiles

Billy Mills

Billy Milles | KU Honorary Degrees 2019Billy Mills is a member of the Oglala Sioux Tribe and grew up on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation. Mills attended Haskell Indian Nations University and the University of Kansas. He attended KU on an athletic scholarship and was a three-time NCAA All-American cross-country runner. During the 1964 Summer Olympics, Mills won an Olympic gold medal in the 10,000 meters, and he remains the only American to ever win the event. Mills’ win in the 10,000 meters is considered one of the greatest upsets in Olympic history.

Mills is a co-founder and national spokesperson of Running Strong for American Indian Youth, an organization that aims to help American Indian people meet their immediate survival needs while creating opportunities for self-sufficiency and self-esteem in American Indian youths. In 2014, in celebration of the 50th anniversary of his gold medal, Mills started Dreamstarter, a grant program to jump-start the dreams of American Indian youths.

Mills is the recipient of many distinguished athletic and humanitarian awards, including the 2015 President’s Council Lifetime Achievement Award, NCAA’s Theodore Roosevelt Award and 2012 Presidential Citizens Medal. He has been inducted into the National Distance Running Hall of Fame, the American Indian Athletic Hall of Fame and the United States Track & Field Hall of Fame.

Elizabeth Broun

Elizabeth Broun| KU Honorary Degrees 2019Elizabeth Broun, director emerita of the Smithsonian American Art Museum, grew up in Independence, Kansas, and holds three KU degrees in art history — a bachelor’s, a master’s and a doctorate. From 1976-83, Broun served as curator and subsequently interim director of KU’s Spencer Museum of Art, overseeing a dramatic expansion of its collections. In 1983, she began her long tenure at the Smithsonian American Art Museum, beginning as chief curator and assistant director and assuming the position of director in 1989. She retired in 2016.

During her 27-year tenure, Broun conceived and successfully completed the renovation of the Smithsonian American Art Museum and the Renwick Gallery’s buildings, all national historic landmarks. Under her direction and with her vision, the Smithsonian American Art Museum has become the premier center for research in the field of American visual history. By dramatically expanding the resources available for research and learning using both in-person and digital access, Broun expanded the appreciation and understanding of our collective cultural history.

On the occasion of her retirement, Broun’s outstanding service was recognized by the Smithsonian Regents with the Joseph Henry Medal, the institution’s highest award.

Teruhisa Ueda

Teruhisa Ueda| KU Honorary Degrees 2019Teruhisa Ueda is the president and CEO of Shimadzu Corporation, one of the world’s largest manufacturers of scientific instrumentation, with 10,000 employees and revenue in excess of $2.5 billion. Ueda is the driving force behind Shimadzu’s corporate philosophy, which is to contribute to society through science and technology. Under his leadership, Shimadzu Corporation is dedicated to making significant investments in research and development of new technologies.

Ueda was born in Yamaguchi Prefecture, Japan. He holds a bachelor’s degree in industrial chemistry, a master’s degree in engineering and a doctorate in applied life science, all from Kyoto University. During the early 1990s, Ueda studied at KU at the Center for Bioanalytical Research, studying under Distinguished Professors Ted Kuwana and Ralph Adams. Ueda credits his time at KU for his understanding and appreciation of a global mindset, deepening his success in business management and broadening his professional expertise.

Ueda’s success illustrates the benefits of being committed to a diversified student experience. Ueda believes students should turn their attention outward, learn about other lifestyles and cultures, and see what they can offer the world. He promotes taking on challenges without fearing failure as well as scientific excellence and responsibility to future generations.

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University celebrates 146th Commencement

Posted on May 25, 2018 in Alumni News and News

The University of Kansas celebrated its 146th Commencement May 13. Nearly 4,000 graduates made the traditional walk down the Hill and into David Booth Kansas Memorial Stadium.

Chancellor Doug Girod addressed his first graduating class as the University’s 18th leader, and Kevin Carroll, the Alumni Association’s national chair, welcomed the Class of 2018 as alumni and encouraged graduates to connect with fellow Jayhawks through their one-year gift memberships in the Association.

Dr. Richard Weinshilboum, c’62, m’67, received an honorary degree during the ceremony. Weinshilboum is a Mayo Clinic scientist who is a pioneer in the field of pharmacogenomics, the study of how drugs respond to a person’s genetics.

Read more about the storied traditions of KU’s Commencement, and watch our slideshow below for photos from this year’s celebration.

 

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A walk to remember: Greg and Dorie Dalzell

Posted on May 16, 2018 in Alumni News and News

Greg and Dorie Dalzell
 

Competing with Commencement

The walk down the Hill is a cherished tradition for most KU graduates. However, some student-athletes have never known the thrill of walking down the Hill due to competition conflicts. KU baseball players, for instance, are often battling in-state rival K-State as graduates gather on Mount Oread.

Meantime, track and field Jayhawks are typically engaged in the conference championship while classmates are popping champagne in Lawrence. Fortunately, one Jayhawk track family made up for lost time and made the most of their KU Commencement experience.

Crossing the finish line

Greg Dalzell, b’86, followed in his father’s footsteps by running for the KU track team. His father, Art Dalzell, d’55, g’64, helped KU win numerous conference championships and a cross country national title (’53) in addition to earning his two KU degrees. Greg followed suit, contributing to a Big 8 conference indoor title (’83) while pursuing his business degree at KU. Unfortunately, the mid-May timing of the 1986 conference outdoor championship meet cost him his opportunity to participate in KU’s time-honored Commencement tradition of walking down the Hill.

Fast forward to 2018, when Greg’s daughter Dorie–a third-generation Jayhawk track team member–was ready to walk, he couldn’t pass up the opportunity to make it a family affair. While many of her Jayhawk teammates were still competing in the Big 12 outdoor track & field championships in Waco, Dorie was able to cross a more meaningful finish line with her father by her side.

“Dorie’s time in Lawrence has been a great experience for both of us, and I cannot believe how fast it went,” Greg shared. “Commencement was so much fun. I can’t imagine I would have had a better time 32 years ago.”

A family affair

The Dalzells share a rare distinction of having three generations of KU track & field captains in the family. When Dorie was awarded the honor for the 2017 season, joining her father and grandfather in holding the title of KU track captain, it was one of the highlights of her KU career.

“It was really overwhelming,” she admitted in an interview for KU Athletics’ Rock Chalk Weekly. “I knew my grandpa and dad had both been captains, so I always kind of wanted to be one, but I didn’t want to express it outwardly. To be a captain, and know that I had kept that going in our family, it felt amazing.”

Dorie had planned to be competing with her teammates in Waco on Sunday during Commencement. However, fate intervened, and a graduation celebration that was thought to be put off for a later date suddenly became possible.

“After Dorie’s track career ended prematurely, the Commencement walk was a great way for the two of us to cap off our shared KU experience,” Greg reflected after a memorable weekend. “Neither of us will ever forget walking through the Campanile together.”

–David Johnston

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Commencement 2018 remarks by Kevin Carroll, Chair of the KU Alumni Association

Posted on May 15, 2018 in Alumni News and News

Kevin Carroll commencement remarks 2018

Kevin Carroll, Chair of the KU Alumni Association, welcomed the class of 2018 to the Alumni Association at Commencement. His remarks were as follows:

I am Kevin Carroll and I am honored to serve as the volunteer Chairman of the Board of the KU Alumni Association. Welcome to the ranks of more than 250,000 proud graduates around the world!

KU is a special place with beauty all around—not just the beauty we see with our eyes, but the beauty we feel in our hearts. As you earned your degree, you have been influenced by countless other Jayhawks who share your passion for KU. Some have been professors or coaches or even roommates you would never have met had you not come to KU.

Many of you have selected mentors to guide you through your student years and beyond—but maybe, others sought you out and asked to mentor you. They saw in you something you did not even see in yourself, and they wanted you to succeed in ways you never imagined. As you leave KU, be one of those people, be a mentor to others. Share the Jayhawk spirit and help others as you have been helped. Share your knowledge and compassion with others. Be a Jayhawk!

Another way to show your school pride is to stay connected.  And, the best way to stay connected with all things KU is through membership to the Alumni Association.  Thanks to the Alumni Association and KU Endowment, I am happy to announce that all members of the Class of 2018 will receive one-year graduation gift memberships in the Alumni Association.

Your membership begins today, and you can download the KU Alumni App to learn about all of your benefits. And, after today’s ceremony, we invite you to stop by the Adams Alumni Center to toast your graduation at our Commencement Open House.

Please make the most of your membership by attending alumni events and watch parties with other successful Jayhawks wherever you are, all around the world.  You also can remain in touch with campus news and fellow Jayhawks through our digital communications, and you can learn more about our Jayhawk Career Network, which will benefit you throughout your life through KU Alumni Mentoring and many other connections. No matter where your journey takes you, you will find Jayhawks to help you feel at home—and we hope you’ll return often to this beautiful campus, your home on the Hill.

Rock Chalk and Congratulations, Class of 2018. Welcome to the KU Alumni Association.

For more about Commencement, read our feature on The Walk, or learn more about the medical researcher who received an honorary degree.

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The Walk: A History of Celebration

Posted on May 12, 2018 in Alumni News and News

Ask KU alumni about their favorite KU traditions, and inevitably the walk down the Hill at Commencement will rank near the top. Chancellor Robert E. Hemenway famously remarked in nearly every one of his Commencement addresses that “the walk is the ceremony,” and all who have witnessed this unique spectacle agree that the winding procession down Mount Oread is not only beautiful to behold, it has become a cherished rite of passage for Jayhawks culminating their KU careers.

Fondly remembered by alumni, the walk down the Hill has been celebrated at KU with great pomp and pageantry for nearly a century, making it difficult to imagine a KU Commencement ceremony before this famous tradition.

At his final Commencement in 2009, former Chancellor Hemenway summarized the experience best. “Today, you have joined graduates in the University’s most time-honored ritual, one that binds Jayhawks together, that attaches them as friends with an emotional glue that never breaks. As we say every year, the walk is the ceremony. You have to walk before you can fly. The walk prepares Jayhawks for flight.”

2003: Chancellor Hemenway at Commencement

Founded with grand fanfare and lofty expectations in 1865, the University of Kansas was little more than a preparatory school offering a few college classes in its early days. As a result, it took more than four years for its first graduates to earn their degrees.

On June 11, 1873, KU conferred its first degrees at a formal ceremony inside the brand new and barely finished University Hall. The building, the most modern and finest of its kind on any college campus, would later be known for the chancellor who championed its construction and presided over that first Commencement ceremony, John Fraser.

University Hall

Although KU’s first graduates did not walk down the Hill, KU’s commencement has always featured a procession. At KU’s first Commencement in 1873, the walk was atop the Hill, starting just south of what is now Spooner Hall toward University Hall, positioned just west of present-day Fraser. Around 1897, the graduates adopted the practice of donning academic regalia, including caps and gowns.

When Robinson Gymnasium was completed in 1907, with a larger space for convening a growing class of graduates, the procession moved with graduates gathering at Fraser Hall and continuing west to Robinson, where Wescoe is currently located.

1913: Commencement at Robinson gymnasium

By 1921, plans were being made to construct a memorial stadium on the site of McCook field, and in 1923, organizers decided to try an outdoor ceremony. A giant tent was erected near the new stadium, however the ceremony proved so hot that the tent-covered Commencement would never be repeated.

1923: The infamous commencement tent

In 1924, Commencement exercises were held for the first time at Memorial Stadium located at the foot of the Hill. Graduates walked from Strong Hall down Mount Oread into the stadium, and the tradition continues to this day.

1950s: Commencement as the Campanile is under construction

In the 1950s, KU graduates added to the tradition by walking through the new World War II Memorial Campanile. With the tower nearing completion–yet still clad with scaffolding–enthusiastic seniors found it too difficult to resist and became the first graduates to walk through the Campanile. The symbolic act of walking through Campanile has signaled the transformation from KU student to graduate ever since.

To learn more about Commencement, including the history of class banners, honorary degrees, and the special experience for Big and Baby Jays, read our full feature, The Walk.

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The Walk: Big Shoes Filled

Posted on May 12, 2018 in Alumni News and News

For the students who play Big Jay and Baby Jay, their special KU experience is one big secret. The students are told to tell as few people as possible their identity, leading to some awkward questions about their whereabouts on game days.

The identity of the students behind the masks are never publicly revealed. You can’t look them up on any website, and there’s no trace of their mascot exploits on social media.

But when Commencement comes, the graduating seniors get their one day to share with the world the activity that made them both a campus icon and completely nameless.

Laura Ballard, d’08, g’09, spent three of her four years at KU cheering for the Jayhawks from the sidelines as Baby Jay. As a sophomore, a graduating senior explained to her the tradition of wearing the boots for the walk down the hill.

“One of the first rules I learned as a mascot was to never be partially dressed in the suit – it ruins the ‘magic’ of the mascot,” Ballard said. “That’s when it hit me how truly special Commencement is. We spend our mascot career doing our best to perform anonymously, and graduation is the one time when we can be both Baby Jay and ourselves.”

“I overheard lots of people commenting on my shoes. A few thought it was a random way to stand out in the crowd, but I heard many exclaim, ‘She must be Baby Jay!’ I was really proud of all I had accomplished at KU as a student and a member of the Spirit Squad, so it felt good to be recognized. I was even asked to take a few pictures with random students, which actually felt very normal since I posed in many pictures with random people as a mascot.”

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The Walk: A Banner Day

Posted on May 12, 2018 in Alumni News and News

Briana McDougall carries the class of 2010 banner down the hill

The class banner tradition dates back to the first Commencement in 1873. Since then, students have lead their graduating class down the hill with banners designed by the Board of Class Officers. A collection of class banners is available for viewing in the Kansas Union.

For Board of Class Officers member Briana McDougall, ’11, Commencement led to “long discussions about what the banner should say” for the class motto, before settling on “Rooted in the Blue, Towering Toward the New.”

“We also got to take photos with the chancellor in her office before Commencement & sat on stage during the ceremony,” McDougall said. “It was a great honor to be able to represent the class & present our motto to the university.”

Jason Fried, c’14, served on the Board of Class Officers, and was chosen to carry the class banner down the hill. “Looking back, it was a great moment. It was definitely something that my parents and relatives were proud of.”

 

Jason Fried carries the class of 2014 banner

To learn more about Commencement, including the history of the ceremony, honorary degrees, and the special experience for Big and Baby Jays, read our full feature, The Walk.

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The Walk: The Highest Honor

Posted on May 12, 2018 in Alumni News and News

Speakers you likely won’t hear at a University of Kansas Commencement ceremony: Chance the Rapper, Oprah Winfrey, or Michael Bloomberg, all of whom have been tapped to speak at commencement events around the country this year.

KU’s Commencement ceremony traditionally features speeches from the university chancellor, the Kansas Board of Regents chair, and the KU Alumni Association chair, and an award presented to extraordinary leaders.

In 2012, under Chancellor Bernadette Gray-Little, the university began awarding honorary degrees. The honor replaced distinguished citations after a petition to the Board of Regents.

The honorary degree is the highest honor bestowed by the university and is awarded to individuals of notable intellectual, scholarly, professional or creative achievement, or service to humanity.

The nomination process opens to members of the university community and the general public each year in March. The Chancellor’s Honorary Degree Committee then forwards several nominees to the chancellor for consideration. The following October, the Chancellor submits nominees to the Kansas Board of Regents for approval, and the recipients are honored at KU’s Commencement ceremony in May.
2012: The inaugural recipients of honorary degrees; Alan Mulally, e’68, g’69, president and CEO of Ford Motor Co. and keynote speaker; former FDIC chair Sheila Bair, c’75, l’78; former Senate Majority Leader Robert J. Dole, ’45; and renowned composer Kirke L. Mechem.

To learn more about Commencement, including the history of the walk down the hill, class banners, and the special experience for Big and Baby Jays, read our full feature, The Walk.

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Mayo Clinic researcher, KU alumnus to receive honorary degree

Posted on May 4, 2018 in Alumni News and News

Dr. Richard Weinshilboum, a KU alumnus, will receive an honorary degree during KU’s 146th Commencement ceremony on May 13.
A Mayo Clinic scientist who is a pioneer in the field of pharmacogenomics — the study of how drugs respond to a person’s genetics — will receive an honorary degree from the University of Kansas.

Dr. Richard Weinshilboum, a KU alumnus, will receive an honorary degree during KU’s 146th Commencement ceremony on May 13. He is the director of pharmacogenomics and chair of the Division of Clinical Pharmacology at the Mayo Clinic Center for Individualized Medicine, and he is also the Mayo Clinic’s Mary Lou and John H. Dasburg Professor of Cancer Genomics.

“Dr. Weinshilboum’s important and foundational work has opened the door to new advances that will help patients far into the future,” said Chancellor Douglas A. Girod. “His groundbreaking research in the field of genomics is helping to bring about a new era in medicine that enables doctors to customize treatments to fit their patients’ specific genetic makeups. We are honored to award him with an honorary degree during our Commencement ceremony this year.”

Girod recommended Weinshilboum for an honorary degree to the Kansas Board of Regents, which approved the chancellor’s recommendation.

Weinshilboum will receive the degree of Doctor of Science for his notable contributions in the field of pharmacogenomics. He earned a bachelor’s degree in zoology and chemistry and a medical degree from KU, concluding in 1967.

During a nearly 50-year career, Weinshilboum has helped to move his chosen field of study from theoretical to practical. Today, treatments can adjust to a patient’s genetics to increase efficacy or avoid life-threatening side effects, a practice known as “precision” or “individualized” medicine.

He has spent most of his career at the Mayo Clinic, where he has worked since 1972. He has earned continual support from the National Institutes of Health and has earned a number of honors from scientific societies, international organizations and universities.

KU awards honorary degrees based on nominees’ outstanding scholarship, research, creative activity, service to humanity or other achievements consistent with the academic endeavors of the university. Recipients do not need to be KU alumni, and philanthropic contributions to the university are not considered during the process.

Past honorary degree recipients include notable leaders such as Nobel Peace Prize winner and Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos, Google Earth creator Brian McClendon, novelist Sara Paretsky, and Ford chief executive officer Alan Mulally.

Juan Manuel Santos, president of Colombia and 2016 recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize, is also a 2018 honorary degree recipient. Santos visited campus in October to accept the honorary degree. Learn more about KU’s honorary degrees here. Information about 2018 Commencement events and activities can be found at the university’s Commencement website, www.commencement.ku.edu.

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Nearly 5,000 graduates walk down the Hill

Posted on May 16, 2017 in Alumni News and News

KU Commencement 2017 | Photo by Steve Puppe
The 145th Commencement of the University of Kansas took place Sunday, May 14, 2017, in Memorial Stadium.

Nearly 5,000 graduates made the traditional “walk down the Hill,” followed by a program and the conferral of degrees by Chancellor Bernadette Gray-Little.

This year, an honorary degree was presented during Commencement to William McNulty, a U.S. Marine and Iraq War veteran who created Team Rubicon, a non-profit agency that recruits military veterans to provide disaster relief and humanitarian aid around the world. Read McNulty’s address to the graduating seniors.

Chancellor Gray-Little closed the ceremony with a farewell address to the graduating seniors. In that address, she urged the Class of 2017 to “run toward the chaos. Run toward the situations where you can make a difference. Use the knowledge and the sense of civic responsibility you’ve developed at KU to improve those situations, help people and make this world a better place.”

New graduates receive a one-year membership in the KU Alumni Association, compliments of KU Endowment and the Association, that runs through May 31, 2018. Graduates should update their mailing and email addresses with the University to ensure they receive information.

Students and parents can find more information about class rings, membership benefits, and alumni networks on our information page for new graduates.

Watch our slide show below to see pictures from Commencement, or view the photos on Flickr. Photos may be downloaded for personal use.
KU Commencement 2017

 

See additional Commencement photos on the University of Kansas Flickr page

 

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