Jayhawks celebrate rare solar eclipse

Posted on Aug 22, 2017 in News

On August 21, Lawrence and the University of Kansas campus were in the path of a rare solar eclipse. Estimates indicated that 99.3% of the sun would be blocked by the moon; however, cloudy conditions in Lawrence obstructed the view of the eclipse for most residents. We reached out to Jayhawks around the country to see how they celebrated the eclipse. Here are a few of their stories and photos. Enjoy!

Larry Stoppel, c’73
Optometrist, Drs. Stoppel & Brown, Optometrists, and Flint Hills Network volunteer

Nancy Stoppel, d'73, and Larry Stoppel, c'73, prepare for the solar eclipse. Photo courtesy of Larry Stoppel.Larry Stoppel and his wife Nancy, d’73, headed to northeastern Washington County and waited at the Evangelical Lutheran St. John’s Cemetery for the solar eclipse. The cemetery is in Lanham, a community that sits on the state line between Kansas and Nebraska.

“The temperature dropped and it was very dark,” according to Nancy. “Looking at the sun when it was in totality was the most amazing thing I have ever seen. Words can not describe it.”

Larry added that “the solar eclipse was AWESOME, but hard to photograph. I like this short video time lapse that runs from 10 minutes before, during totality and 10 minutes after.”

Watch Larry’s time-lapse video below:

 


Ramy Rahman, b’09
Security Engineer, Optiv Security, and Orange County Network leader

The week before the eclipse I was swamped with work and didn’t have very much time to plan, but I hopped on Amazon to find the most inexpensive solar filter possible for my camera. I found a 4×4 solar filter sheet, cut it to the diameter of my 70-300 mm telephoto lens, and affixed a UV filter so it would stay on during shooting.

The day of the eclipse I had quite a few conference calls to run, emails to answer and work, work, work but I wasn’t going to let that prevent me from capturing the eclipse. Around 9:05 a.m. (PT) I went outside to set up my Canon 6D camera and check out where the sun was going to be.

Initially we had some cloud coverage in Costa Mesa, but it eventually cleared and I was able to focus on the sun within a matter of minutes. I have a custom firmware installed that allows me to automate shooting with the built-in intervalometer which shot a 1/100th of a second exposure every 10 seconds with an f5.6 aperture and ISO set to 100.

I left the camera shooting right outside my office window and between work emails and calls, I went outside to reposition the camera to account for the movement of the sun out of frame.  Eventually, around 11:49, I had captured about 856 shots of the entire event. Every shot was pretty clear considering we had no cloud coverage in SoCal that day—shocker, I know.

During my lunch break I downloaded the shots and began to post on Facebook.  Here is the beginning of eclipse:

2017 Solar Eclipse. Photo courtesy of Ramy Rahman.

Then I went back to work and as the day was winding down, I discovered I had enough shots to do a progression. I took shots from 10-minute intervals of the event and compiled this:

2017 Solar Eclipse progression. Photo compilation courtesy of Ramy Rahman.



Thomas Wall, g’11
Owner/Architect, Mitchell Wall Architecture & Design

Thomas Wall, owner/architect of Mitchell Wall Architecture & Design in St. LouisMitchell Wall Architecture & Design in St. Louis was the location of a little-known KU alumni eclipse watch party. With over half my staff being graduates, pretty much every day is.

My wife, Megan (Lowdermilk) Wall, d’97, joined us about 11:15 a.m. and I got to work setting up my late father’s telescope. After much fiddling, focusing, adjusting, and focusing again, I managed to get the telescope focused on the sun (with a filter of course) and my camera attached to it.

By noon, everyone in the office was coming in and out in a constant parade. I don’t think any work got done for about 90 minutes.

But soon the moon started taking a sizable bite out of the sun, and we all stood together outside looking up at the sky. I haven’t seen this many Jayhawks looking at an orange ball since Mario’s Miracle. And when the sky got dark, and the birds stopped chirping and the crickets started, we all exclaimed at the same time. Seeing the green and gold and red and purple shooting from the sun as totality was reached was a site to behold. It was truly an amazing experience.

2017 Solar Eclipse. Photo courtesy of Thomas Wall.

2017 Solar Eclipse. Photo courtesy of Thomas Wall.

Photos shot with a Canon 6D using a Celestron C5 telescope as a lens.


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Naismith Archives visit the Little Apple

Posted on Jun 19, 2015 in News

James Naismith Archives event, Manhattan
More than 30 Jayhawks gathered June 18 at the Little Apple Brewing Company in Manhattan to view artifacts from James Naismith’s life in a popular exhibit presented by the KU Libraries.

The glimpse into the life of Dr. Naismith included photographs, handwritten notes and even an example of the athletic sock worn by athletes during Naismith’s KU coaching days.

Fun fact: the reservation for the event was held under James Naismith’s name.

KU Libraries will continue exhibiting the Naismith artifacts throughout the Alumni Association’s ‘Hawk Days of Summer tour, including an upcoming presentation at the East Kansas Wine Festival and at events on the east coast. Check the events calendar for upcoming tour dates and cities.

View more photos from the event on Flickr.

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Rock Chalk Roadshow hits the road

Posted on Aug 26, 2013 in News

The Rock Chalk Roadshow, a week-long traveling event hosted by the Office of Admissions, is on the road in central and western Kansas this week.

This year’s Roadshow features events in Manhattan, Salina, Hutchinson, Garden City and Hays where prospective Jayhawks and their families can meet KU representatives and learn about all things Jayhawk while enjoying free food and giveaways.

The first event of 2013 was held last night in Manhattan at the public library. Tyler Rockers, coordinator of chapters for the KU Alumni Association, was in attendance along with volunteers from the Flint Hills Chapter. “It was a great event and an excellent chance for KU to showcase all it has to offer to students who may not otherwise get much exposure to KU,” he said.

Alumni are invited to attend the Rock Chalk Roadshow to share their KU experience with prospective students. Here’s a list of the remaining events:

Monday, Aug. 26, 6-7:30 p.m.Rock Chalk Roadshow | www.kualumni.org
Salina Bicentennial Center
Salina, KS

Tuesday, Aug. 27, 6-7:30 p.m.
Kansas Cosmosphere and Space Center
Hutchinson, KS

Wednesday, Aug. 28, 6-7:30 p.m.
Clarion Inn
Garden City, KS

Thursday, Aug. 29, 6-7:30 p.m.
The Fox Pavilion
Hays, KS

Being a Jayhawk is a lifetime commitment. We hope you’ll consider attending an event near you to help share your school spirit with a new generation of Jayhawks! Click here to register for the Rock Chalk Roadshow.

Help us identify future Jayhawks by sharing the names of prospective KU students who are in the sixth grade or older. After you complete the Legacy Recruitment Program form, your future ‘Hawk will become part of the Office of Admissions mailing list and will receive information about KU. Contact Joy Maxwell, Director of Legacy Relations, at jmaxwell@kualumni.org for more information.

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