Jayhawks, get your markers ready

Posted on Feb 11, 2016 in Alumni News and News

Adult Coloring Sheet Jayhawk | www.kualumni.org
Adult coloring books were one of the hottest trends of 2015 and a popular stocking stuffer during the holidays, and now you can color in Jayhawk style.

Susan Younger, creative director for the KU Alumni Association, whipped up this intricately designed Jayhawk (can you spot the hidden basketballs?!) to help you unleash your inner artist—and maybe relieve some stress, too.

Download and print your free coloring sheet, and take a few minutes to get in touch with your creative side. We’d love to see your masterpiece—email a picture to us at share@kualumni.org, or post it on Facebook, Twitter or Instagram and tag us.

And just in case you need something to entertain your future Jayhawks while you’re coloring the night away, remember that we also have more KU-themed printable coloring sheets and printable activity sheets to help keep them occupied.

—Debbi Johanning

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Happy holidays from the staff of the KU Alumni Association

Posted on Dec 17, 2015 in Alumni News and News

We wish you a joyous holiday season! Please enjoy our video greeting below, featuring favorite campus landmarks decked out for the holidays.

Love the photos? Send them to your friends and family! We created shareable versions of our favorite scenes for you to download and share.

Thank you for being a Proud Member of the KU Alumni Association, and Rock Chalk!

 
Holiday Hours:
The KU Alumni Association offices will be closed on Thursday, Dec. 24, and Friday, Dec. 25, for the holidays. We’ll be open again at 8 a.m. on Monday, Dec. 28. The office will be closed on Friday, Jan. 1, for New Year’s Day, and we’re back to regular hours on Monday, Jan. 4.

Past holiday cards:
Each year, our creative staff looks forward to putting together a new holiday greeting for alumni. Check out our holiday cards from years past.

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Future Jayhawk sold on KU

Posted on Sep 29, 2015 in Alumni News and News

Future Jayhawk“Dad, I am going to KU when I go to college!” this young Future Jayhawk told his father.

Dad shared more of the morning conversation with us:

“He was so cute this morning, he already had his school binder decorated with the Jayhawk stickers and the button, and he wanted to know where his Baby Jay birthday card was. As you can see, it is now part of the Jayhawk decorations on his school binder.”

Members of the Future Jayhawks program receive age-appropriate gifts each year when they join, along with a special birthday card and gift and other activities, announcements and surprise gifts throughout the year. A popular perk of membership is participating in the annual Summer Reading Challenge, where Future Jayhawks are encouraged to read 31 books or 31 hours in 31 days during the month of July.

We suspect this youngster will have a lot more fun studying for his classes with his stylish Jayhawk binder in tow!

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April Fool's Day 2015: Mascot Mayhem

Posted on Apr 2, 2015 in Alumni News and News

Yesterday, Association members found a special edition of their monthly Member eNews in their email inboxes. The questionable content, however, might have led some to wonder—was this a joke? A quick check of the calendar confirmed it for those not willing to read to the end. Happy April Fool’s Day!

Fighting_email

Click to enlarge

Still, our good-natured gag, in which we announced a new logo featuring the old 1941 Fighting Jayhawk, managed to fool more than a few loyal alumni, some of whom took time to write concerned replies. Many voiced strong support for our existing KU Alumni Association logo, which we greatly appreciated! Others praised the faux change, voicing equally strong support for the historic ‘hawk. Even more alumni conceded our playful prank had gotten them good.

Thanks for playing along and sharing your feelings with the KU Alumni Association about our beloved bird!

Enjoy a few of our favorite responses

One of the very best April Fools jokes I’ve ever seen. You had me until the last paragraph. But even then, I had to think about it. Well done!
– Steve S.

You actually had me going. Pondering throwing my sweatshirts and t-shirts in favor of the new/old Jayhawk.
–Ray S.

I wish it weren’t a joke.  The Fighting Jayhawk would be an awesome mascot.
–Doug P.

You got me! I was not a very happy camper until I got to the end of the article.
–Drew C.

Still trying to get the taste of the bait out of my mouth. I swallowed it hook, line and sinker.
–Tom B.

April Fool’s or not, I DO like the Fighting Jayhawk!
–Richard S.

What fun! Thanks for the google maps and the game. I was concerned about the “fighting” Jayhawk.
–Judi Y.

My own university punked me! I was ready to restock my Jayhawk gear with the fighting Jayhawk, it’s too hard to find.
–Steven T.

I can only hope this “News” about changing the Jayhawk image is an April Fools joke! …
I’m a proud alumna who even found a man to make me, “Mrs. J. Hawks”, that’s how loyal I am!
–Jane H.

Ooh, that was mean—and you got me! I hope you both spend all day on the phone responding to angry and confused alumni!
–Loren T.

Yes, Loren, we did spend a LOT of time correcting confused alumni, and if our good-humored joke caused any genuine concern among our members, we apologize. We appreciate the passion, pride and spirit our loyal alumni show us every day. Thanks for being such good sports! Rock Chalk!

–David Johnston

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April Fool’s Day 2015: Mascot Mayhem

Posted on Apr 2, 2015 in Alumni News and News

Yesterday, Association members found a special edition of their monthly Member eNews in their email inboxes. The questionable content, however, might have led some to wonder—was this a joke? A quick check of the calendar confirmed it for those not willing to read to the end. Happy April Fool’s Day!

Fighting_email

Click to enlarge

Still, our good-natured gag, in which we announced a new logo featuring the old 1941 Fighting Jayhawk, managed to fool more than a few loyal alumni, some of whom took time to write concerned replies. Many voiced strong support for our existing KU Alumni Association logo, which we greatly appreciated! Others praised the faux change, voicing equally strong support for the historic ‘hawk. Even more alumni conceded our playful prank had gotten them good.

Thanks for playing along and sharing your feelings with the KU Alumni Association about our beloved bird!

Enjoy a few of our favorite responses

One of the very best April Fools jokes I’ve ever seen. You had me until the last paragraph. But even then, I had to think about it. Well done!
– Steve S.

You actually had me going. Pondering throwing my sweatshirts and t-shirts in favor of the new/old Jayhawk.
–Ray S.

I wish it weren’t a joke.  The Fighting Jayhawk would be an awesome mascot.
–Doug P.

You got me! I was not a very happy camper until I got to the end of the article.
–Drew C.

Still trying to get the taste of the bait out of my mouth. I swallowed it hook, line and sinker.
–Tom B.

April Fool’s or not, I DO like the Fighting Jayhawk!
–Richard S.

What fun! Thanks for the google maps and the game. I was concerned about the “fighting” Jayhawk.
–Judi Y.

My own university punked me! I was ready to restock my Jayhawk gear with the fighting Jayhawk, it’s too hard to find.
–Steven T.

I can only hope this “News” about changing the Jayhawk image is an April Fools joke! …
I’m a proud alumna who even found a man to make me, “Mrs. J. Hawks”, that’s how loyal I am!
–Jane H.

Ooh, that was mean—and you got me! I hope you both spend all day on the phone responding to angry and confused alumni!
–Loren T.

Yes, Loren, we did spend a LOT of time correcting confused alumni, and if our good-humored joke caused any genuine concern among our members, we apologize. We appreciate the passion, pride and spirit our loyal alumni show us every day. Thanks for being such good sports! Rock Chalk!

–David Johnston

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Happy holidays from our family to yours

Posted on Dec 18, 2014 in Alumni News and News

Each year, our creative staff brainstorms ideas for a holiday message to alumni. Past cards have included Jayhawk sugar cookies, Potter Lake ice-skating escapades and animations featuring iconic University locations.

This year, our holiday card gives a nod to the sense of family we have at the Alumni Association—right down to clowning around with “siblings” and never quite nailing that “perfect” family photo. And, in case you’re wondering, the candy cane was broken by the end of the photo shoot.

From all of us to Jayhawks everywhere, we hope you have a wonderful holiday season. Your loyalty and support are vital to our beloved university. Rock Chalk!

 

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Vote for your favorite Jayhawk

Posted on Nov 7, 2014 in Alumni News and News

Jayhawks GIF

We want to know: which Jayhawk is the favorite of KU alumni? Cast your vote in our fun poll by December 31!

To assist you in the voting process, here’s a brief refresher on the history and rich tradition of our beloved mascot.

The story of the Jayhawk begins not with the bird, but with the word, which originated during the historic struggles of Kansas settlers in the 1850s. The name describes a bird that was a cross between a blue jay and a sparrow hawk, both of which displayed fierce, aggressive, even predatory traits. As Free State and anti-slavery forces struggled for control of Territorial Kansas, “Jayhawkers” most often described Free Staters who fought as vigilantes against Missouri “Border Ruffians” aligned with the Confederacy. The outcome of the Civil War and the end of slavery added luster to the word, and Kansans since then have worn it as a badge of proud history.

The University of Kansas informally adopted the term Jayhawk in 1886. Professor E.H.S. Bailey and his science club students adopted the famous rallying cry “Rock Chalk, Jayhawk,” and it remains one of the college world’s most distinctive chants to this day. KU student Henry Maloy drew the first Jayhawk mascot in 1912. To review the complete history and tradition of the Jayhawk, visit http://www.ku.edu/about/traditions/jayhawk.

Vote today! We’ll share the results after the start of the new year.

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Make your own brick library

Posted on Jul 29, 2014 in Alumni News and News

img_brick_books_h1

You may have noticed the cover of the July, 2014 issue of Kansas Alumni magazine, which featured bright, sunny porch steps stacked with colorful “books.” The library consisted of hand-painted bricks and pavers painted to look like old books featuring KU authors and other classics. If you are into crafty projects, you may have seen this popular idea online. Google “book bricks” and you’ll find more tutorials and how-to videos. In fact, our Associate editor, Chris Lazzarino, first spotted this idea, and we thought it would be fun to do. The bricks make great bookends, garden art, or even a nice focal point on a windowsill or shelf.

The books are fairly easy—the hardest part may be deciding your favorite classics— and can be made by anyone. If you don’t feel up to hand-painting the lettering, you can use alphabet stickers found at most craft stores. We kept our books simple, decorating only the spine, which is really all that shows if you choose to use them as bookends. Painting on bricks is a rough endeavor, so embrace the imperfections and don’t strive for perfect lines!


 

Here’s the easy step-by-step tutorial:

Step 1: Bricks and Pavers
Gather old bricks if you can find them, or buy an assortment of pavers from a garden or home improvement store. If you are using old bricks that have a little bit of moss on them, first soak them in a light solution of water and bleach (about 1/4 cup to 1 gallon of water), and then scrub them to remove the moss. Let the bricks dry several hours or overnight. If you are using pavers that you have just bought, they tend to be dusty so rinse them off well and let them dry several hours or overnight.

img_step3_basecoat1Step 2: Supplies
For other supplies, you will need acrylic paint, brushes, blue painters masking tape, tracing paper, and computer printouts of book titles (or use alphabet stickers for the lettering). You can use inexpensive paint for this project. In fact, the liquid acrylic that you can buy in bottles at the craft store are perfect for this. You also need to have an assortment of brushes on hand, from wide flat brushes, to small narrow brushes for lettering. Use bristle brushes—foam brushes will not hold up against the surface of the brick.

Step 3: Base coat
Paint your bricks and pavers with a white coat of paint. This helps seal in the porous surface, and will help you get even coverage when you apply more coats of color.

img_step5_bookcoversimg_step4_pagesStep 4: “Pages”
To created weathered-looking pages, paint three edges with an off-white or cream paint. Add a second coat. When the paint is mostly dry, use a darker tan and with a long narrow brush, paint lines along the pages. Broken lines work well, and we are going for a rough, weathered look here, so wiggle the brush and don’t worry that the lines aren’t straight. Add additional lines with white paint to achieve the look.

img_step5_darkpaintimg_step5_highlightsimg_step5_tape2Step 5: Book Covers
Make sure the paint on the “page” area is thoroughly dry, and then tape over the edge, leaving a margin for the book cover. (Be sure to press the tape down on the edges well.) Paint  your book with a solid color, adding two coats. Add a little black paint to your book color, and add the deeper tone to cracks and creases in the brick. Use a wet paper towel to blend the dark color in and wipe away the paint that is not in the cracks. Next, add a little white for highlights to the cover. This is easy to do with “finger-painting.” Dip your finger in a little paint, wipe most of it off on newspaper or a paper towel, and then lightly rub across your book. Adding the deeper tones and highlights help give the book a bit of dimension.

img_step6_symbolStep 6: Spine and Details
The next step is to embellish the spine. Add panels for the book titles, stripes, and symbols. Most publishers used a small symbol or brand on their spines, and adding a small embellishment  to mimic this can add to the effect. When the book is completely dry, remove the tape that protected the “page” part of the book. Even if your page paint was thoroughly dry when you taped it, you may remove some paint when you  strip off the tape. Don’t worry about this, the random spots will add to the aged look of your books, or you can go back and touch up with paint if you prefer.

img_step7_lettering1img_step7_lettering4Step 7: Lettering
We printed out book titles from the computer, and then traced them onto the books before we hand-lettered them. You can totally wing it if you feel comfortable, or you can use small alphabet stickers. (Stickers not recommended if you will use these books outdoors). For help with hand-lettering, have a good tracing paper to transfer the title. Speedball’s “Mona Lisa” tracing paper has dark carbon, and it shows up well on the rough surface of the brick or paver. Tape a piece of tracing paper in place, and then trace your printout. The result will be rough because of the surface of the brick, but it should give you enough to go on. Carefully paint your lettering, dark paint on light surfaces, and light paint on dark surfaces. Don’t worry if your lettering is rough, it just adds to the charm!

img_step7_lettering3Paint a “drop shadow” to the left of the letters, which will help the title pop a bit. If you want, add the title to the front of the book as well, especially if you plan to use the books as pavers in a garden.

Step 8: Sanding
Use a very rough sandpaper (we used 60 grit), to sand along the edges and rough up the bricks. If desired, drag the sandpaper across random areas to remove paint.

img_step8_sanding1img_step8_sanding2

 

 

 

 


img_brick_books_v1And that’s it! Have fun making your own colorful library of brick “books.” Recreate your favorite childhood stories, plan a themed collection for a boy or a girl, or decorate a windowsill near your favorite reading nook. These would also look great edging a garden area. If you plan to use them outside, you might want to coat them with a matte-finish spar varnish so that the paint will last longer. Have fun and be sure to send us photos of your “new” books.

—Susan Younger, Creative Director

 

Photograph of books on steps by Steve Puppe,
copyright www.stevepuppe.com

Photographs of the process by Susan Younger

 

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’Hawks in Rock

Posted on Feb 28, 2014 in Alumni News and News

img_arizona_rock_jayhawk

Have you ever heard of the term “Pareidolia?” Most people haven’t, but surely everyone has experienced it. Pareidolia (parr-i-DOH-lee-uh) is the phenomenon of recognizing familiar shapes in clouds or objects, the man in the moon, religious icons in toast … or Jayhawks in rocks.

Tim Brandt, b’74, director of the Adams Alumni Center, saw this rocky likeness of our beloved mascot while he was running around the Troon North Golf Course in Scottsdale, Ariz. He was struck by the shape of an outcropping of rock, and he sent us the photo. “All you need is a little paint, and it would look just like the Jayhawk,” he says.

img_rockJayThrough the years, alumni have sent images of Jayhawks in clouds, piles of leaves and even puddles. The Adams Alumni Center is also home to a collection of figurines from alumni, including this cute little Jayhawk made from four garden rocks glued together and painted in bright hues. No one knows who sent it or when, but its silhouette does look quite a bit like the rock formation in Arizona.

Studies show that if a person sees images in objects and clouds, an activation in the brain has occurred. Alumni know that when we see Jayhawks everywhere, there’s been an activation in the heart. If you have images of your own “Hawk Pareidolia,” email them to us at share@kualumni.org so we can post them.

—Susan Younger

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Happy holidays from the KU Alumni Association

Posted on Dec 17, 2013 in Alumni News and News

Thank you for your membership in the KU Alumni Association! Your loyalty and support are vital as we continue to strengthen our beloved university. We look forward to another memorable year in 2014.

We hope you enjoy our holiday greeting!

Rock Chalk,

Kevin J. Corbett and the KU Alumni Association Staff

P.S. We’d love for you to share our video with fellow Jayhawks!

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