KU Mentoring connects current, aspiring sports communicators

Posted on Jan 10, 2019 in Career/Life and News

Dayton Hammes, Jayhawk Career Network

The KU Mentoring program offers students the chance to get their burning career questions answered by those who know best: people in their career field.

Dayton Hammes, a sport management student and communications intern for Kansas Athletics, took advantage of the platform to connect with a pro in her dream field of college athletics communications.

Andrew Sherwood, j’08, has worked in collegiate athletics since graduation, including two years with the Williams Education Fund. We sat down with Dayton to hear more about her experience.

How did you and Andrew connect?

I was looking for a KU alumnus in college athletics to talk to, and a coworker recommended Andrew to me. I reached out to him on KU Mentoring and he was more than happy to talk!

What did you talk with him about?

As someone who wants to pursue a career in collegiate athletic communications, he shared a lot of his own personal experiences in the industry and what to do to continue finding new opportunities. We actually had the opportunity to meet in Dallas over fall break, and we are still in contact today!

Why would you recommend students use KU Mentoring?

The platform is a great resource for students that might not have many connections in their industry of interest. Personally, I already had several mentors in the industry, but the platform is great for students who aren’t sure how to make the first move to find that go-to person for advice. It’s great to immediately have a connection with alumni on the platform by being Jayhawks.

What advice do you have for students for using KU Mentoring?

Reach out to alumni and don’t be afraid to meet or set up a call with one! Alumni want to help students be the best they can be.

The Jayhawk Career Network provides a central hub to coordinate career connections and networking opportunities for students and alumni at every life stage. KU Mentoring is part of the Jayhawk Career Network and provides a mentor matching program for students and alumni to create connections as well as provide professional insight and opportunities. The Jayhawk Career Network is open to all KU alumni and students.

Tags: , , , ,

Top 18 Stories of 2018

Posted on Dec 21, 2018 in Career/Life and News

Fraser | Top 18 Stories of 2018

As 2019 approaches, it’s time to take a look back at our year with our top 18 stories of 2018. These are the stories most liked and shared by the Jayhawk community. Thanks for a great year!

Top 18 Stories of 201818. KU Mentoring connects neuroscience student with surgeon

Thomas Angel took the long road to the University of Kansas, but he’s making sure his time here counts. Thanks to the power of the KU Mentoring platform, Angel connected with a practicing surgeon who he will shadow over winter break.

17. Remembering Chancellor Shankel

The University family lost an extraordinary Jayhawk and truly dedicated leader in Chancellor Emeritus Del Shankel. Shankel twice led KU through pivotal transitions as interim chancellor, from 1980 to ’81 and 1994 to ’95. The Kansas Board of Regents officially designated him KU’s 15th chancellor in 1995.

16. Giving Thanks to KU Mentors

In honor of the season, the KU Alumni Association thanks the thousands of Jayhawk students and alumni who have joined KU Mentoring. More than 3,500 users have registered on the platform, and we’re excited to help the next 3,500 make a connection with the Jayhawk Career Network.

15. He’s got it if he can find it

Rod Ernst, third-generation owner of the iconic downtown Lawrence hardware store Ernst & Son, died Jan. 23, the store announced on its Facebook page. Ernst is the subject of a feature story in issue No. 1, 2018, of Kansas Alumni.

14. Simply the Best

2018 Debate championship team | Top 18 Stories of 2018

At the beginning of the fall semester, University of Kansas debater Quaram Robinson refused to set her sights on winning the National Debate Tournament, the annual four-day showdown of the best competitors in college debate. She feared she would only set herself up to fail. But here she was, eight months later, in the championship round of the NDT in Wichita. Robinson and her teammmate, Will Katz, had just delivered their final rebuttals late in the evening of March 26, the last day of the tournament.

13. KU to honor Rob Riggle with Distinguished Alumni award

Rob Riggle, one of the most recognizable Jayhawk alumni, was honored this year with the 2018 Distinguished Alumni Award from the College of Liberal Arts & Sciences at the University of Kansas. He visited Lawrence in November to accept the award.

12. KU Alumni Conversation: 120 Years of KU Basketball

KU alumni Curtis Marsh, j’92, and Creighton Coover, b’98, g’01, sat down to talk KU hoops and recall their all-time favorite Jayhawk players and memorable moments on the occasion of the 120th anniversary of basketball at the University of Kansas.

11. Les Miles announced as Head Football Coach

Les Miles, a national championship-winning former coach at Louisiana State and Oklahoma State, has been named the new head football coach at the University of Kansas, Kansas Athletics Director Jeff Long announced Sunday.

10. University of Kansas names Jeff Long director of athletics

University of Kansas Chancellor Douglas A. Girod today named Jeff Long as the university’s new director of athletics. Long brings more than two decades of experience in athletic administration at the Division I level, most recently at the University of Arkansas. During that time, he transformed Arkansas’ athletics department into one of the most successful in the country and established himself as a national leader within intercollegiate athletics.

9. Bawk Chalk: Alumni construct creative hen house for their brood

Top 18 Stories of 2018

What started as a means to pass time between NCAA tournament games turned into much more for Jarrod, f’95, g’03, and Kate Neely Williams, ’97, who this spring masterminded the construction of Alhen Field House, a wildly creative chicken coop built in the likeness of KU’s legendary basketball arena.

8. Holiday Vespers

At a university brimming with history, the story of a monthly concert in the early 1920s turning into one of KU’s longest-running traditions is filled with twists and turns. For 94 years, Jayhawks have celebrated the holiday season with Vespers. Our annual holiday greeting for alumni featured a look back at this storied tradition.

7. Pay Heed: ‘Beware of the Phog’ banner turns 30

In 1988, a couple of KU students hatched an idea, created a banner and left a legacy that has come to define KU’s storied Allen Fieldhouse, known to many simply as “the Phog.” Thirty years later, the friends and KU alumni reunited to reminisce about the banner and how it all came to be.

Top 18 Stories of 2018

6. Front and Center

A finger-snap ago, Central District was nothing more robust than an artist’s rendering, a wish list, part of a master plan for what our beloved campus could one day be, how it should live and breathe and teach and embrace, for the next half-century or more. Less than two years later—“We tried to build it as fast as we could,” said one project architect—and this thing is done.

5. Traditions Night

At the start of every fall semester, anxious KU freshmen fill the stadium for Traditions Night, a rite of passage where they learn about the cherished traditions of old KU. Year after year, KU puts on a show. And there’s always a showstopper.

4. Sign of the times: KU student goes viral at College GameDay

Whenever ESPN’s College GameDay comes to Lawrence, students know to bring their A-game when it comes to signs. In between the signs cheering the Jayhawks and jeering the West Virginia Mountaineers, one student took a jab at the channel broadcasting the whole event.

3. Hard Stories

Drawing on her background as a daughter of rural Kansas, one writer is challenging America to face up to its class divide. Sarah Smarsh, c’03, j’03, published her first book, Heartland: A Memoir of Working Hard and Being Broke in the Richest Country on Earth, and took aim at stereotypes and assumptions. Smarsh was featured on the cover of issue No. 5, 2018, of Kansas Alumni magazine.

2. Campus icon ‘Tan Man’ to celebrate 75th birthday, and you’re all invited

Thousands of students have spent time soaking up the sun in front of Wescoe. But KU students from the late 1960s through the 1980s remember one particular man’s legacy of relaxing on the beach. John Schneider, more commonly known as “Tan Man,” spent the better part of three decades as a campus icon, sharing his charm and kindness with Jayhawks.

1. The Walk

Commencement | Top 18 Stories of 2018

Students gather on Memorial Drive on a Sunday morning, grouped up by their schools. Friends, siblings, parents and grandparents line the sidewalks on the way to Memorial Stadium. As they cross through the World War II Memorial Campanile and begin their descent down the Hill, graduates take their final steps as students into their future as KU alumni. Our Commencement feature reviews the history of this beloved Jayhawk tradition.

And there you have it — our most popular articles and features of 2018! Perhaps not surprisingly, stories that feature KU traditions or nostalgic memories of time on campus resonate strongly with Jayhawks, and we hope to bring you more of these pieces in 2019. Rock Chalk! 

Tags: ,

Jayhawks give back during second annual KU Cares Month of Service

Posted on Dec 3, 2018 in Career/Life and News

The second annual KU Cares Month of Service gave Jayhawks the chance to meet each other and support their communities at the same time. Alumni in 23 cities across the country organized 27 different events.

The KU Alumni Association set out to have participants share the spirit of the holidays by giving back to people in need.

Here’s a sample of the many awesome events that alumni network volunteers organized. Thanks again to all who participated!

Phoenix Jayhawks: Lunches for the homeless

KU alumni in Phoenix packed meals for people in need at St. Vincent De Paul’s “Hearts and Hands” event.

Phoenix volunteers | second annual KU Cares month of service

Twin Cities Jayhawks: Halloween Supply Drive

Minneapolis Jayhawks started the month of service a day early: a night early, to be exact. They partnered with the St. Louis Park Emergency Program to spend their Halloween forgoing candy and collecting supplies for a local homeless shelter instead.

Twin Cities Jayhawks | second annual KU Cares month of service

Portland Jayhawks: Oregon Food Bank

A small group made a big difference in Portland. Six Jayhawks showed their love for their city with two and a half hours of work leading to 455 packaged meals.

Portland Jayhawks |second annual KU Cares month of servicePortland Jayhawks | second annual KU Cares month of service

Milwaukee Jayhawks: Breakfast for military families

Area Jayhawks got to work to thank area veterans and their families by cooking breakfast at the the Fisher House, a temporary housing option for military families. Families stay at the house while their loved one receives care at the Medical Center.

Milwaukee Jayhawks | second annual KU Cares month of service

Denver Jayhawks: Watch party with a purpose

Local alumni started their watch party season with a purpose. The group collected more than 500 items for the St. Francis Center, a local homeless refuge.
Denver Jayhawks | second annual KU Cares month of service

KU Cares Month of Service may be over, but Jayhawks can get together to support their communities anytime! Visit the KU Cares page for more information, and reach out to your local network leaders to organize an event in your area.

Tags: , , ,

Jayhawk Career Network Profiles: Carlos P. Beltran

Posted on Oct 17, 2018 in Career/Life and News

Carlos P. BeltranThe KU School of Journalism and Mass Communications invited alumni back to its Home on the Hill for J-School Generations, a two-day homecoming event.

One of the highlights was J-Talk, a TED-talk style event featuring alumni sharing stories of lessons they’ve learned through their careers.

Carlos P. Beltran, c’09, j’09, discussed his experiences as a digital content producer, both as a freelancer and for NBC Left Field, a documentary unit that profiles human-interest stories such as a KU alumnus’ classroom museum.

We sat down with Beltran to ask him more about his time at KU and his advice on choosing what to do after graduation.

When did you know what you wanted to do your career?

Ever since I was a child running around with a camera I knew I wanted to do something with video. It wasn’t until my second year at KU that I switched to journalism and decided to do it for a living.

As for what kind of video, it wasn’t until 2013, when I finished a fiction project that took two years of my life and it didn’t pan out the way I wanted. I decided I didn’t need fancy equipment and huge crews. I knew that with a camera, a microphone, a great subject, and my editing skills, I could make good work, and I dedicated myself to documentary filmmaking.

How did you get involved with such a cool production like NBC Left Field?

The unit opened a year and a half ago in Brooklyn, and after freelancing in Venezuela for a couple years I was looking for somewhere to settle down. My good friend Mariana Keller, who works at NBC News Digital told me about the opening, and after sitting down with the leader of the unit they liked my work enough to bring me on.

How did your time at KU help you get to where you are now?

I learned everything from ethics, to how to approach networks with my work, the basics of narrative and storytelling, and of course editing over at Dole, spending days editing on Final Cut Pro 7 in the media labs. Here you’ll learn how to be a great journalist, out there, you practice being one. Once you leave, don’t think you’ll get the perfect job right off the bat. You’ll go through times where you’ll discover what you don’t like to do. It might take years, it took me from graduation in 2009 to 2013 when I realized what I really wanted to do.

What advice do you have for those starting out in their careers?

When I graduated from school, I thought I wanted to work at an ad agency, or work in video, and I wasn’t getting what I wanted. I immediately thought I maybe should go get my masters, but I never did. Someone told me “if you want to be a documentary filmmaker, go make documentaries.” Go make one, and then you’ll have a business card. If you want to work in this industry, don’t wait until someone commissions you. If you find an amazing character, then shoot the story. That two minute video that you produced independently shows your skills and that you’re passionate about your work. Go shoot something, make yourself a portfolio.

Tags: , , , , ,

KU Mentoring connects neuroscience student with surgeon

Posted on Oct 11, 2018 in Career/Life and News

Thomas Angel took the long road to the University of Kansas, but he’s making sure his time here counts. Thanks to the power of the KU Mentoring platform, Angel connected with a practicing surgeon who he will shadow over winter break.

Coming to KU

After nearly a decade deployed in Afghanistan, Iraq, and Kuwait, Angel tore his PCL and had microfracture surgery. He chose to be “med boarded out” and  applied to the University of Kansas on his girlfriend’s recommendation.

Angel is pursuing a double major in Latin and behavioral neuroscience, the latter of which requires an extensive amount of shadowing to be accepted into medical school. After studying abroad in Italy last summer, he was looking for a mentorship with someone in his dream career of neurosurgery.

Thomas Angel in KuwaitThomas Angel at an Italian hospital

Making a Connection

After learning about the KU Alumni Mentoring platform through the Student Alumni Leadership Board, Angel jumped at the opportunity. “I don’t think people realize how hard it is to find doctors who are willing to let students shadow,” he said.

One of the recommended mentors was Dr. John Aucar, c’82, MD’86, an acute care surgeon and KU alumnus. Angel connected with him through the platform and they set up a meeting that Saturday.

“When I met Dr. Aucar we immediately made a connection. My first duty station was in El Paso, Texas, and he practices in the area. Over winter break he’ll be in El Paso, and he invited me to join him. To be able to meet a mentor that you instantly click with, can have a successful relationship with and both benefit in different ways from the experience is a dream come true.”

Angel wants to be a neurosurgeon, a goal that comes with seven to eight years of residency. With that much preparation required, he strives to make his experiences count.

“My number one goal for job shadowing is to make a personal connection with the person I’m shadowing. Beyond that, it’s about making sure you understand what’s actually happening. A lot of times, especially with medical, the doctors aren’t teachers. You have to work to get answers from them. It’s easy to just stand and watch, but understanding why they’re doing it is my key to shadowing.”

Thomas AngelHelping Students Succeed

Since arriving at KU, Angel has taken advantage of the many opportunities provided to him, including joining the Student Alumni Leadership Board to add a voice for students like him. “I wanted to find a niche on campus for non-traditional students to be in leadership positions. I saw it as a place for me where my opinion matters and where I can help create and shape [Student Alumni Network] events.”

Angel draws from a completely different set of experiences compared to traditional students, but he wants those in his shoes to know that they belong on this campus.

“The KU community is completely different than how you think it would be from the outside looking in. I am involved in several different clubs and boards around campus and fit in just fine. I’m 12 years older than my average peer at this stage in my academic career and I learn things from them daily, and I hope that they learn from me just as well. Non-traditional students have life experiences and stories of their own that can positively impact this campus.”

–Ryan Camenzind

Stay tuned for more about Angel’s job-shadowing experience during winter break. For more information on how the Jayhawk Career Network can help you connect with KU alumni, visit kualumni.org/jayhawkcareernetwork.

Tags: , , , , ,

KU’s “Kramer” brings Late Night memories

Posted on Sep 28, 2018 in Career/Life and News

Jeremy Boldra as Kramer at KU basketball games

It’s been 25 years since the 1993-94 basketball season, when Jacque Vaughn introduced himself to the world with an overtime buzzer-beater against Indiana. For some Jayhawks, their experience that season was special not just for what happened on the court, but also in the stands.

Jeremy Boldra spent his sophomore year in the stands as Kramer, Jerry’s goofy neighbor in the hit television series “Seinfeld”. What began as an idea for a Halloween costume put Boldra, d’97 g’03, into Captain Jayhawk-levels of fame for one fun season.

We could try to tell the story, but perhaps it’s best to let the man himself share how Kramer came to be.

Jeremy Boldra as Kramer at KU basketball games

An idea is born

The idea came to me when a roommate saw me with my hair standing up and told me I looked like Kramer. At the time I had no idea who that was, so he introduced me to “Seinfeld,” which we soon were all watching together every Thursday night. As we watched, I knew I could totally play that character. So I decided I’d do it for a Halloween party my sophomore year. That fall, I saw an ad in the Daily Kansan for a sitcom character contest at Late Night with Roy Williams, which was the night before Halloween.

When I got to the Fieldhouse, I knew I had to make an entrance like Kramer always would. So I swung the door open and stormed in, making so much noise that all the contestants that were already there turned and said “Kramer!” One of the judges literally leaps over a table and tells me “You’re in!”

So it’s time for the contest and we’re in the hallway where the team comes out. They called my name, and I had a plan. I just jogged out there, and once I made it to the free throw line, I wiped out. I hit the floor, then got up shaking, then strutting out to half court. By the time I got there, fans were chanting “Kramer! Kramer!” The chanting went on over the next contestant. One contestant got booed, another got no response. I made it to the finals, the Kramer chants started again, and it was a blast.

Kramer lives on

The next night was Halloween, and we were talking with some cheerleaders at a party who said I should dress up for home games, so after a little convincing I decided to do it.

So I dressed up as Kramer in the student section, and by the second or third game people were asking me for autographs, it was getting a little weird. So I decided to not dress up for the next game. Which was Temple, which we lost. As I was leaving, several people said to me “We lost because you didn’t dress up.” So I start dressing up again and sure enough, we go on a huge winning streak.

I only did it for that year. I had a lot of fun, but it was time. Since then, I’ve run into people who remember me from those games.

Where is Kramer now? Boldra is the superintendent at Flint Hills school district, just outside of El Dorado. Jeremy and his wife, Bryna, have two sons, Landon, 11, and Keenan, 8. This year’s Late Night in the Phog takes place Friday, Sept. 28.

—Ryan Camenzind

Tags: , , ,

Three generations of Marching Jayhawks play together at Homecoming

Posted on Sep 26, 2018 in Career/Life and News

Three generations of Marching Jayhawks Homecoming 1999

Every Jayhawk has his or her own home on the Hill, but for Patrick McCarty, it’s one shared with his family.

McCarty, f’04 g’14, had the special experience of sharing the field with his father Gary McCarty, d’76, and grandfather Philip McCarty, d’52, for alumni band day at 1999’s Homecoming celebration.

“At first, it seemed like a normal game day,” McCarty said. “However, right before the halftime performance, it dawned on me how special of a moment and opportunity it was for myself, my father, and my grandfather to perform together on the campus that we all went to college to. It is probably the first and only time we ever had the opportunity to perform together.”

The McCartys claim three generations in the Marching Jayhawks, but music runs deeper in the family.

“My grandfather was one of the first to study in the beginning stages of the KU music therapy program, and he ended up working in hospitals helping patients cope and recover through the use of music. My father went on to be a high school band director for over 30 years before he retired. My mother (Diane McCarty, d’74 g’81) was an elementary music teacher for many years before retiring. My younger brother is also a professional musician.”

Patrick keeps the music going, too. He’s in his 14th year as a high school or college band director, currently at Olathe North. He points to his time at KU as a reason why.

“The professors, colleagues, and friends that I made during my time at KU in the music education program and band program have been incredibly inspirational towards the musician, teacher, and person that I now am today. The band program provided a great musical and social outlet, including some very special performance memories, like playing drumset in the KU Men’s Basketball Band at the 2002 and 2003 Final Four.”

—Ryan Camenzind

KU Alumni Band performs annually during the Homecoming Parade and at halftime of the Homecoming football game. For more information about alumni band weekend, visit the KU Band Alumni Network page

Tags: , , , ,

TRIO’s ‘Great Mug Giveaway’ a hidden Homecoming tradition

Posted on Sep 26, 2018 in Career/Life and News

TRIO/SES Great Mug Giveaway at Homecoming 2018

TRIO/SES Great Mug Giveaway at Homecoming 2018In the basement of Strong Hall, the staff and students of TRIO Supportive Educational Services and STEM are hard at work filling the halls with decorations, cookies, music and mugs. Hundreds and hundreds of mugs.

What started 15 years ago as an idea to get TRIO students more involved during Homecoming has grown into a tradition you don’t want to miss.

Rod Oelschlager, then TRIO Academic Coordinator, launched the event in 2003. “The first one was in Room 7 with about 25 mugs that my mom donated,” Oelschlager said. “We put up a few crimson and blue streamers, made hot chocolate in a turkey roaster, and waited to see if anyone was interested. The mugs and hot chocolate were gone in 15 minutes. We knew we were on to something.”

Each year, the Great Mug Giveaway gets bigger and bigger. The number of mugs has multiplied, and a few streamers has given way to hallways turned into art studios. Oelschlager is since retired but remains heavily involved in his creation.

“After a few years in Room 7 and more and more people showing up, we moved into the hallway outside our offices,” Oelschlager said. “Today we will have over 500 mugs to choose from, hundreds of guests, and decorations that we start on in July or early August each year.”

Collecting all the mugs is a year-round process. Rod and the TRIO staff keep an eye out for mugs at thrift stores and garage sales. They also appreciate mug donations.

TRIO is a college opportunity program that provides support for students from disadvantaged backgrounds in their pursuit of a successful college experience.

Even in retirement, Oelschlager gives his time to TRIO and his alma mater. “Like so many alums at KU, we have a real love for our University. Rock Chalk is much more than just a chant to us.”

TRIO/SES Great Mug Giveaway at Homecoming 2018

—Ryan Camenzind

Tags: , , ,

Highlight with a KU connection brings memories of best Jayhawk trick plays

Posted on Sep 21, 2018 in Career/Life and News

Kansas football trick plays

If you’ve been on social media at all this past week, you’ve surely seen the highlight of the year in college football. If you haven’t, enjoy:

North Texas’ Keegan Brewer faked out the entire Arkansas team by standing around after catching the ball, without ever signaling for a fair catch. After a couple of Arkansas players started walking to their sideline, Brewer took off for a touchdown.

Brewer started his football career at the University of Kansas, where he caught 15 passes as a true freshmen. After his freshman year, Brewer transferred to North Texas to be closer to home.

Brewer’s heroics got us thinking about other trick plays that Kansas has run throughout the years.

2016: Downed in the end zone

When the Jayhawks wore all blue against Iowa State in 2016, wide receiver LaQuvionte Gonzalez took the opportunity to camouflage himself in the blue turf of the end zone. Wide receiver Steven Sims returned the kick, then turned and threw across the field to Gonzalez, who scampered down the sideline for a 34 yard gain.

2016: Razzle-dazzle to hook the Horns

After driving the length of the field to cut the deficit to 21-16, the Jayhawks needed to go for 2 to cut the deficit to a field goal. Head Coach David Beaty called for misdirection, with running back Ke’aun Kinner taking a direct snap and pitching the ball to Steven Sims, who ran his way into the end zone to close the deficit.

2008: Orange Bowl heroics

Faced with a 4th and 10 at midfield, Head Coach Mark Mangino took a big gamble to keep the drive going. A direct snap to running back Brandon McAnderson, who threw to Micah Brown to keep the drive alive. While the drive didn’t end with points, we promise you’ll like the ending if you stick around.

2004: Randle ends the streak

With Kansas State in town holding an 11-game winning streak over KU, Mangino pulled out all the stops to bring the Jayhawks a victory. Quarterback Adam Barmann threw a screen to wide receiver Brandon Rideau, who pitched it to running back John Randle, who dove for the end zone to send the Memorial Stadium crowd into a frenzy.

1996: Hidden Henley

Throwing it way back here, to when Glen Mason’s Jayhawks traveled to Salt Lake City to play the #20 Utes. Down 38-35, KU lined up for a field goal, with running back June Henley jogging towards the sideline. Quarterback Matt Johner, serving as the holder on the play, threw the ball to a wide-open Henley near the sideline for a touchdown.

1995: No punt in Norman

Head Coach Glen Mason had more than one trick up his sleeve. When the Jayhawk offense stalled out in Norman against the #15 Sooners, punter Darrin Simmons kept the ball and ran it himself for a nearly 50 yard gain. KU would go on to win 38-17.

We probably missed a crazy play from back in the day, so let us know if we need to add your favorite one!

—Ryan Camenzind

Tags: , , , ,