KU launches bike share program

Posted on Apr 19, 2018 in Campus News and News

KU bike share program

KU Parking & Transit has partnered with VeoRide to launch KU Bike Share, a new program that allows the KU and Lawrence community to rent a bicycle using a smartphone.

Renting is simple: Find the nearest available bike using the VeoRide app, and scan the bike’s QR code to unlock it. After your ride, park at any bike rack on campus and push a slider down on the bike to lock it. Rides are only 50 cents per 15 minutes, with daily, monthly and yearly rates available.

The Bike Share program comes as a result of the KU Bicycle Advisory Committee, a campus group that had input from KU Parking and Transit, Student Housing, the Center for Sustainability, and the city of Lawrence.

“The committee is a group of stakeholders across campus that have been working on bikeability and bike infrastructure on campus since we released a campus bike plan in 2016,” said Kim Criner, education and outreach coordinator at the KU Center for Sustainability. “We really tried to have all the voices at the table that are interested in what we’re doing.”

And don’t worry: The people in charge have thought all about the hills. The committee made sure to get bikes with seven gears. VeoRide can designate bikes in-app as free-to-ride “lucky bikes,” which provides a free ride in exchange for getting the bike back to a central location. VeoRide also hired local staff to maintain the bikes and move them back up the Hill as needed.

Currently, all bike rides must conclude on campus. However, discussions with the city of Lawrence are in the works to allow riders to leave bikes downtown.

KU bike share programEach VeoRide bike includes instructions in the front basket

-Ryan Camenzind


WATCH:

Hear Candice Xie, co-founder of VeoRide, explain how the bike sharing program works.

 

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Burtnett family to receive Millie Award

Posted on Apr 10, 2018 in Campus News and News

In recognition of their service to Wichita-area alumni, Jerry and Lucy Burtnett will be presented with the Mildred Clodfelter Alumni Award, affectionately known as the “Millie” award, at Jayhawk Roundup on April 13.

Roundup reliable

Jerry and Lucy Burtnett, Millie Award recipientsJerry, p’69, and Lucy have helped organize the Jayhawk Roundup since 2006, and they hosted the event in 2011 and 2012. KU Alumni Association president Heath Peterson thanked the Burtnetts for giving “a tremendous amount of sweat equity to Jayhawk Roundup, both serving on the volunteer committee and later as chairs of the event.”

Danielle Hoover, director of donor relations and Wichita programs, echoed Peterson’s praise, stating the Burtnetts “are some of the hardest working volunteers I have ever worked with. They’ve spent many, many hours helping set up, decorate and clean up the Murfin Stables for Jayhawk Roundup.”

Jerry and Lucy also served on the Wichita Network‘s board from 2011 to 2015 and contribute their time for Jayhawks for Higher Education.

“We got involved because of our local KU contacts and wanted to help,” said Jerry. “Working with our KU friends was very enjoyable and we continue to help with Roundup.”

The Burtnetts, who are Life Members of the KU Alumni Association, now split their time between Wichita and Florida.

Jerry and Lucy Burtnett as event chairs at the 2011 Halloween-themed Jayhawk Roundup

The Burtnetts as “event chairs” at the 2011 Halloween-themed Jayhawk Roundup

About the award

The Mildred Clodfelter Alumni Award was created in 1987 to thank alumni and friends for sustained volunteer service to the University at the local level. The award honors Mildred Clodfelter, b’41, who worked for the University for 47 years, including 42 at the Alumni Association.

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Kansas men’s basketball season comes to a close in San Antonio

Posted on Apr 2, 2018 in Campus News and News

We heart u Hawks sign from the KU student section | Photo from University Archives | basketball season ends

After a season filled with ups and downs, a 14th straight conference championship and a trip to the Final Four, the Jayhawks fell to the Villanova Wildcats Saturday night in the national semifinal.

KU fans gathered in San Antonio, Allen Fieldhouse, and at watch parties from coast to coast to watch the Jayhawks in the Final Four.

At the Final Four

More than 5,000 Jayhawks started their game day right outside the Alamodome for the pregame party hosted by the KU Alumni Association and Kansas Athletics. The KU band, Spirit Squad and mascots held a pep rally, with food trucks and cash bars nearby.

Final Four pregame party in San Antonio 2018

Back home in Lawrence

Dozens of Lawrence-area bars and restaurants hosted watch parties, but the most popular site for a big KU game remained the same. Thousands of fans flocked to Allen Fieldhouse to watch the game on the video board. Students filled the student section, and threw shredded Kansans into the air for pregame introductions.

Final Four Watch Party Allen Fieldhouse

Wherever Jayhawks may be

Alumni networks hosted more than 75 watch parties around the country. Many network leaders claimed it was their biggest turnout in years. The Denver Network alone hosted 1,000 Jayhawks at Stoney’s Bar and Grill.

Denver Network Final Four watch party 2018

Although we hate to see the season end, the Alumni Association is proud of this team, and we are always proud to be a Jayhawk.

Visit the ’Hawks ’n Hoops postseason hub for more information, and don’t miss additional Final Four coverage from Lawrence, San Antonio, and alumni networks around the country.

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A healthy dose of arguing leads debate teammates to marriage

Posted on Mar 30, 2018 in Campus News and News

Plenty of Jayhawks think they have the best “how I met my spouse at KU” story. But Bill and Dana Hensley’s story isn’t up for debate.

Bill, c’73 l’76, and Dana, d’73 g’76, met each other through the KU debate program. After two years on the team together, it was only natural that they developed some chemistry. Ultimately, it led to marriage.

After this year’s team won a national championship, we reached out to the Hensleys to learn more about their time at KU and how the program has changed over time.

How did you meet?

“We both debated in high school in Kansas, but didn’t meet. Bill joined the debate squad as a freshman and competed for KU all four years. Dana was a piano major and didn’t debate until transferring as a junior to the School of Education with an emphasis in English and Speech in secondary education.

One course requirement was Introduction to Debate, which was taught by a graduate student/assistant debate coach. He encouraged Dana to come out for the KU debate squad and dip her toe into debate at a low-key tournament in Emporia. He gave her some debate material to look at. The next day, Dana opted to take the bus from Daisy Hill due to rain. At the next stop, Bill got on, saw the debate material on Dana’s lap, and struck up a conversation.”

Bill and Dana Hensley | KU debate teammates debate couple

What are your memories of KU debate?

“We remember spending a lot of time on debate and enjoying every minute. The squad was large, talented, and fun to be around. We had great coaches and traveled often. We had only one tournament together as colleagues. We always joked that Dr. Parson, the Head Jayhawk (Coach), thought that might break us up. It didn’t.”

Are you still involved in the program?

“There is an active debate alumni association that follows the KU debate program. Last year, in association with the National Debate Tournament which KU hosted, we had a debate association reunion at which some of the current KU debaters attended and [current debate director] Scott Harris spoke. Without financial support from KU alumni and other friends of KU debate, the program couldn’t travel the large squad to national tournaments and compete at the high level it has historically.”

How does debate nowadays compare to when you were students?

“It is probably more specialized now than when we debated, but the activity continues to match KU debaters against the best and the brightest in other universities, both public and private. Judging by KU’s track record in recent years, the KU program is in the best shape it has ever been, even though we will both claim we debated during the halcyon years.”

Thank you to the Hensleys for sharing their story! Debate is one of the oldest activities on KU’s campus. The first debate on campus was held on November 8, 1867. Learn more about KU Debate, and find out how you help support KU Debate as an alumnus.

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Trio of famous Jayhawks to call Final Four action

Posted on Mar 29, 2018 in Campus News and News

Rob Riggle unveiling Charlie Hustle shirt | Kansas Teamcast announcers

Jayhawks, your wishes have been granted: You can watch the the Final Four with announcers who love the Jayhawks as much as you do.

When KU plays Villanova in the Final Four Saturday night, tune in to TNT to watch the Kansas TeamCast. It will feature familiar faces Dave Armstrong, Scot Pollard and Rob Riggle breaking down the action.

TeamCast presentations are telecasts tailored to the schools participating in the Final Four national semifinals. The concept brings local flavor to the game with additional cameras and team-centric replays, custom halftimes, comprehensive team and player storylines and more.

Armstrong, ’83, will serve as the play-by-play announcer, which he’s done for the Jayhawks since 1993. He’s also served in the same role for multiple professional sports teams.

Pollard, d’97, partners with Armstrong as the color analyst. He’ll provide a unique perspective after a four-year career as a member of the Kansas men’s basketball team. Pollard finished his career in KU’s top 5 in rebounds and blocked shots and spent 12 years in the NBA.

Riggle, c’93, rounds out the team by reporting from the sideline on head coach Bill Self and the Jayhawks. (No word yet on how serious the KU actor and comedian will take his job.)

The regular telecast will be available on TBS, with Villanova’s TeamCast airing on truTV. Tip is expected to be 7:49 p.m. CDT Saturday night, or 40 minutes after the conclusion of the Michigan-Loyola Chicago game which begins at at 5:09 p.m.

If Scot Pollard’s enthusiasm in a video he posted to Facebook is a preview, the trio of Jayhawks are sure to have a fun night—as will we!

Visit the ’Hawks ’n Hoops postseason hub for more information, and don’t miss additional Final Four coverage from Lawrence, San Antonio, and alumni networks around the country.

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KU Debate wins 2018 National Championship

Posted on Mar 27, 2018 in Campus News and News

The University of Kansas’ most dominant team has brought home another trophy.

2018 National Debate champions Will Katz and Quaram RobinsonQuaram Robinson and Will Katz defeated Georgetown University late Monday night in Wichita to become KU’s 6th National Debate Tournament champions. The team joins previous champions from 2009, 1983, 1976, 1970, and 1954.

The KU debate program has performed at a high level throughout its history, qualifying for 67 National Debate Tournaments over the 72-year existence of the competition.

The team of Robinson and Katz dominated all season, winning the Rex Copeland Award as the top policy debate team in the country for the 2017-18 regular season. KU debate director Scott Harris said the pair had “the best regular season performance by a KU team in my 28 years directing the program.” Robinson in particular made school history as the first KU debater to advance to the championship final twice, and the first to make it to the elimination rounds four times.

Robinson is a senior from Austin, Texas, majoring in African and African-American studies and Katz is a senior from Topeka, Kansas, majoring in economics.

-Ryan Camenzind

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Welcome home Hawks: Allen Fieldhouse celebrates a Final Four

Posted on Mar 26, 2018 in Campus News and News

When the KU Men’s Basketball team sent out the call, Jayhawks delivered.

After hours of pandemonium on Massachusetts Street, thousands of students, fans and alumni made the trek to Allen Fieldhouse to welcome the Final Four team home.

Fans were treated to a replay of the Elite Eight game, reliving Sviatoslav Mykhailiuk’s game-tying basket that sent the game to overtime and Malik Newman’s overtime scoring barrage to clinch a trip to San Antonio.

As the seconds ticked away on the replay, the video board transitioned to a highlight package of the game, mixed with fan videos from social media and the party on Mass Street. When the video ended with the Final Four logo, the crowd roared as the Jayhawks walked in.

With Devonte’ Graham leading the team in while holding the regional trophy, Head Coach Bill Self addressed the crowd first, asking the question everyone was thinking: “Did these guys play like men today, or what?”

Graham, Newman, and Mykhailiuk all spoke as well, thanking the fans for their support, and asking fans to continue that support at the final four.

“I hope all y’all can get to San Antonio,” Graham said, “and hopefully we can win two more for y’all. Rock Chalk.”

-Ryan Camenzind

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Shawnee teacher brings history to life with “Classroom Museum”

Posted on Mar 6, 2018 in Campus News and News

Keil Hileman, Shawnee teacher who brings history to life with his "Classroom Museum"

Keil Hileman believes that the best way to teach students history is to bring the history to them.

NBC’s Left Field, a studio that creates documentaries for social media, recently visited Hileman, d’93, g’96, at Monticello Trails Middle School in Shawnee, Kansas. The segment featured his “Classroom Museum,” a room full of artifacts that began as a personal collection and continues to grow due to community support.

As the video racks up views and shares, we reached out the KU alumnus to hear more about NBC’s visit, his time at KU, and his goals for his students.

 

What was it like having NBC visit your classroom?

It was a great adventure for my students and I. We had a great time meeting two amazing videographers. They have traveled the world doing stories and chose to come see what we do in our “Classroom Museum” each day. Very cool honor for all of us and our community.

What have people been saying as the video gains in popularity?

There have been lots of new artifact donations and people offering to help financially. The museum budget is currently ¼ of what it used to be so any artifacts or support is appreciated. My emotion and compassion for my students has really struck a chord with people across the country. They see how much a teacher can care about their students…. and why. My favorite connection so far has been with teachers who want to know how to start their own museums and artifact collections. It’s very exciting to see a cool idea spread.

What influences your teaching style?

I have worked hard to simply teach my students in the most effective ways for 25 years. If what I was doing did not work, I threw it away and found a better way to connect my students to the history of the world around them. I continue to use unanswered questions as a way to guide my student’s problem solving and analysis skills. This was a valuable lesson taught to me by Dr. Joe O’Brien, an amazing and awarding-winning teacher in the KU School of Education. He changed my life and allowed me to go on and change the lives of my students by opening their minds, touching their hearts and defining their dreams.

What do you hope students take away from your class?

I want my students to become lifelong learners. I want them to find a passion for something and hold on to it. I want their passion to fuel their life experiences. We have a museum credo… or belief statement:

Explore… Empower… Excel…
Explore your World
Empower yourself and others
Excel in everything you do

—Ryan Camenzind

Keil E. Hileman is one of 50 teachers profiled and celebrated in the book, “American Teacher: Heroes in the Classroom,” by Katrina Fried. The publisher notes three intentions: “To bring everyone interested in America’s future into 50 classrooms to experience public education first hand; to inspire other teachers through sharing ideas, innovations and successes; and to inspire administrators, parents and policy makers to listen deeply to the thoughts expressed by these teachers about education. Hileman was the Kansas Teacher of the Year in 2004. He was also featured in the Winter 2004 and Fall 2012 issues of the The Jayhawk Educator, a publication of the KU School of Education.

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Hawk Link Alumni Lunch connects Jayhawks in KC

Posted on Feb 21, 2018 in Campus News and News

Hawk Link alumni lunch

The Student Alumni Network recently partnered with Hawk Link to hold the first Hawk Link Alumni Lunch. The goal was to connect at-risk students with potential mentors from the vast network of KU alumni.

Hawk Link, a program based out of the Office of Multicultural Affairs, supports students of color, queer students and undocumented students while they navigate their first two years on campus. “It’s building on the components of what students need while they’re here and how we can set them up to be successful into the future,” said Jordan Brandt, academic advisor in the Office of Multicultural Affairs.

One of their programs, Study in the States, takes students to different cities to explore historical sites that tie in with their curriculum. A recent field trip to the American Jazz Museum in Kansas City brought a unique opportunity for Hawk Link students to connect with members of the Black Alumni Network in the area.

“It just made sense to invite the Alumni Association on our Study in the States trip,” said Brandt. “Students were already engaging with faculty, staff, and peers through Hawk Link but we were lacking an alumni piece. It’s great having folks who care about the population of students that we serve and want to invest in them.”

“I first learned about OMA through a tour with KU,” said Camille Moore, a freshman studying pre-med. “Through the Hawk Link program, we all live in Oliver on the third floor and have all gotten close with one another. I learned a lot talking to alumni about how to get through the process of college, and I now have the chance to reach out to them in the future.”

Jeainnie Brown, b’94, enjoyed the opportunity to both give back to students of color and connect with black alumni. Luke Bobo, Ph.D, e’82, was effusive in his praise for the students and their poise.

“The young people I interacted with are bright, articulate and aware,” Bobo said. “I look forward to these students making their mark on the KU community and I also look forward to them making a mark on our society-at-large.”

The Student Alumni Network is expanding its on campus reach with both KU and student organizations by offering usage of the Adams Alumni Center and helping connect students, alumni, and the Lawrence community. SAN’s other on-campus partnerships include a ‘trunk-or-treat’ for Lawrence area children with the Student Involvement and Leadership Center, and Big Jay’s Recess, an upcoming event with the Office of Multicultural Affairs and SILC.

Hawk Link alumni lunch group picture

To learn more about the Student Alumni Network and to see upcoming events, follow them on Facebook, Twitter, or visit the website.

-Ryan Camenzind

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Sign of the times: KU student goes viral at College GameDay

Posted on Feb 19, 2018 in Campus News and News

Whenever ESPN’s College GameDay comes to Lawrence, students know to bring their A-game when it comes to signs. In between the signs cheering the Jayhawks and jeering the West Virginia Mountaineers, one student took a jab at the channel broadcasting the whole event.

Oklahoma’s Trae Young, considered by many to be a frontrunner for National Player of the Year, has received consistent coverage from the media all season, drawing the ire of some fans.

Jacob Camenzind, a sophomore from Wichita studying mechanical engineering, decided to poke some fun at the whole situation with a sign that read “ESPN mandated this sign be about Trae Young.”

“I knew College GameDay would probably talk about Trae Young since the show is essentially pregame coverage for all the games that day. I was also well aware of how tired some people are about ESPN’s constant coverage of Young, so I figured that’d be a good subject for the sign.”

A good subject it was, as Jacob began getting compliments and picture requests as soon as he walked into Allen Fieldhouse that morning. As the countdown to going live continued, the sign gained some new fans.

ESPN's Rece Davis with KU sophomore Jacob Camenzind and his College GameDay sign“When Rece Davis walked onto the court, he saw my sign, looked at me, and started laughing. As the rest of the analysts came in, Rece Davis pointed it out to Bilas, Williams, and Greenberg and they all gave a chuckle as well. During the show, one of the cameramen trained his camera on me, and he gave a thumbs up as I held up my sign. When I got on the video board, I knew we were on TV, and my whole section went crazy. Rece Davis stuck around after the show and took pictures with fans, and he told me my sign was hilarious.”

Jacob’s brush with fame wasn’t done. His tweet about the sign began to blow up, with more than 100 retweets on his own account, multiple KU fan accounts joining in the fun, and even a shoutout from Sports Illustrated.

Despite the sign, Jacob wanted to make his actual opinion on Trae Young clear.

“I love him as a player, don’t let the sign fool you. And to be completely honest, I have no problem with ESPN’s coverage of Trae Young. He is putting on a historic season, and he deserves every minute of attention he gets. I’m pretty tired of all the hate directed to him, but I still couldn’t resist making the sign because I knew people would find it funny.”

—Ryan Camenzind, j’17, Jacob’s brother, stood next to Jacob at College GameDay and watched as Jacob’s phone died in 20 minutes due to the constant buzz of notifications.

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